Reformed Forum http://reformedforum.org Reformed Theological Resources Tue, 07 May 2024 13:58:42 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=6.5.3 http://reformedforum.org/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2020/04/cropped-reformed-forum-logo-300dpi-side_by_side-1-32x32.png Vos Group – Reformed Forum http://reformedforum.org 32 32 Vos Group #88 — Temptability and Peccability http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc853/ Fri, 03 May 2024 05:00:00 +0000 https://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=43667 In this thought-provoking episode, we dive deep into the intriguing account of Jesus’ temptation by Satan in the wilderness. Join us as we explore the profound insights offered by Geerhardus Vos on pages 339–342 in his work Biblical Theology and unpack the ultimate issue at stake in this cosmic confrontation: Who should be God, and […]]]>

In this thought-provoking episode, we dive deep into the intriguing account of Jesus’ temptation by Satan in the wilderness. Join us as we explore the profound insights offered by Geerhardus Vos on pages 339–342 in his work Biblical Theology and unpack the ultimate issue at stake in this cosmic confrontation: Who should be God, and whose Messiah would Jesus be?

We grapple with the perplexing questions surrounding Jesus’ temptability and peccability. How could a sinless Jesus be tempted, and what does this imply about his ability to sin? We examine Vos’s argument that the things Satan suggested were not inherently sinful, only wrong due to God’s prohibition, and consider how this differs from modern interpretations that see the temptations as allurements towards a worldly, political messianic role.

Vos’s work invites us to ponder the profound mystery of a fully human Jesus who is intimately united with the Holy Spirit and possesses a divine nature. We consider how these unique aspects of Jesus’ identity make his sinlessness even more unthinkable than Adam’s, and we wrestle with the implications for our understanding of Jesus’ impeccability.

Through a careful analysis of Vos’s insights and a lively discussion of the theological complexities involved, we aim to shed light on this pivotal moment in Jesus’ earthly mission and its significance for our faith. Join us as we explore the depths of Jesus’ commitment to the path of humiliation and suffering, and the ultimate triumph of his messianic glory.

Chapters

  • 00:00:07 Introduction
  • 00:02:33 Calvinism: The Plan of Salvation
  • 00:07:31 Camden’s Trip to Budapest and Vienna
  • 00:14:09 Temptability and Peccability
  • 00:22:50 Bavinck and Vos on the Person of the Son
  • 00:37:59 The Nature of Jesus’ Temptation
  • 00:42:48 Other Theories of the Messianic Nature of the Temptation
  • 00:46:41 Christ’s Victory Comes through Suffering unto Glory
  • 00:52:06 Satan’s Intent to Circumvent Redemption
  • 01:00:17 Conclusion

Participants: ,

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In this thought provoking episode we dive deep into the intriguing account of Jesus temptation by Satan in the wilderness Join us as we explore the profound insights offered by ...GeerhardusVos,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #87 — Deuteronomy and the Temptation of Jesus http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc849/ Fri, 05 Apr 2024 05:00:00 +0000 https://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=43449 In this installment of Vos Group, we turn to p. 336 of Vos’ book Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments, focusing on the temptations of Jesus Christ. This discussion ventures into the heart of Jesus’ wilderness temptations, offering a rich, theological analysis that challenges and enlightens. We consider the strategic use of Old Testament quotations […]]]>

In this installment of Vos Group, we turn to p. 336 of Vos’ book Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments, focusing on the temptations of Jesus Christ. This discussion ventures into the heart of Jesus’ wilderness temptations, offering a rich, theological analysis that challenges and enlightens. We consider the strategic use of Old Testament quotations by Jesus during his confrontation with Satan, underscoring the deep, theological significance of these moments.

This episode not only unpacks the unique messianic nature of Jesus’s temptations but also firmly opposes a moralizing interpretation, instead highlighting the redemptive work accomplished through Christ’s victory over sin. Through a careful examination of Jesus as the obedient Son and true Israel, this episode reveals the layers of meaning in these biblical narratives, connecting them to broader themes of redemption, covenant theology, and the Christian life. As we understand Jesus’ role as the mediator who binds and spoils the strong man, this episode encourages believers to find their identity in Christ, resting in his victorious work on our behalf.

Chapters

  • 00:07 Introduction
  • 04:44 Jesus’ Temptation as a Prime Example of His Earthly Ministry
  • 08:43 The Wilderness Temptation
  • 17:10 The Temple Temptation
  • 23:05 The Mountain Temptation
  • 28:44 The Emphases of Matthew and Luke
  • 38:38 Overcoming in Jesus and Entering Paradise
  • 45:01 Looking Ahead
  • 48:11 Conclusion

Participants: ,

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In this installment of Vos Group we turn to p 336 of Vos book Biblical Theology Old and New Testaments focusing on the temptations of Jesus Christ This discussion ventures ...Gospels,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #86 — The Lord’s Temptation and Our Own http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc839/ Fri, 26 Jan 2024 06:00:00 +0000 https://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=42234 In this installment of our Vos Group, we turn to pp. 335–336 of Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to explore the uniquely messianic nature of these temptations, examining how Christ’s experiences differ significantly from human temptations. A key theme of this passage is the comparison of Christ’s temptation with Adam’s, emphasizing Christ’s role as […]]]>

In this installment of our Vos Group, we turn to pp. 335–336 of Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to explore the uniquely messianic nature of these temptations, examining how Christ’s experiences differ significantly from human temptations. A key theme of this passage is the comparison of Christ’s temptation with Adam’s, emphasizing Christ’s role as the second Adam and the federal head encountering temptation.

Vos warns against a moralizing interpretation of the temptations, instead focusing on their theocentric character and their relation to true religion. The episode further explores the role of the Holy Spirit in these temptations, particularly in empowering Christ and highlighting the inauguration of the kingdom of God.

The discussion is rich in its exploration of redemptive history, connecting Christ’s wilderness temptations to the broader biblical narrative, from Adam’s failure to Israel’s typological sonship, leading to Christ’s successful fulfillment of God’s commands as the obedient Son of God. This comprehensive analysis aims to deepen understanding of Christ’s work and encourages listeners to appreciate the significance of these biblical events in the context of the entire history of salvation​​.

Chapters

  • 00:07 Introduction
  • 04:32 The Religious Character of Jesus’ Temptations
  • 09:39 Jesus’ Temptation Compared and Contrasted with Adam’s
  • 16:40 Encouragement for Sinners
  • 19:54 The Nature of the Temptations and Jesus’ Use of the Law
  • 25:25 Satan’s Strategy in Tempting Jesus
  • 32:33 Israel’s Temptation and Christ as the Obedient Son of God
  • 40:21 The Work of the Spirit in Jesus’ Temptation
  • 53:08 Conclusion

Participants: ,

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In this installment of our Vos Group we turn to pp 335 336 of Biblical Theology Old and New Testaments to explore the uniquely messianic nature of these temptations examining ...BiblicalTheology,NewTestament,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #85 — The Temptation in the Wilderness http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc832/ Fri, 08 Dec 2023 06:00:00 +0000 https://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=41978 In this installment of Vos Group, Lane Tipton and Camden Bucey discuss pp. 330–333 of Geerhardus Vos’ book, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments. In this section, Vos focuses on the temptation of Jesus in the wilderness, a pivotal event in the Gospels. Vos examines various interpretations and challenges to the historicity and objectivity of this […]]]>

In this installment of Vos Group, Lane Tipton and Camden Bucey discuss pp. 330–333 of Geerhardus Vos’ book, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments. In this section, Vos focuses on the temptation of Jesus in the wilderness, a pivotal event in the Gospels. Vos examines various interpretations and challenges to the historicity and objectivity of this event, discussing theories that view it as mythological or parabolic. He argues for its historical and objective reality, using scriptural references such as Matthew 12:29 to support his view. Vos emphasizes the dual nature of the event as both a temptation by Satan and a probation by God, underscoring its importance in the Messianic mission of Jesus. He contrasts this with the temptation of Adam in Genesis, noting differences in their respective contexts and purposes. Vos also explores the implications of the event on the understanding of Jesus’ sinlessness and His role in atonement. Throughout, he maintains a theological perspective that situates the temptation within the broader narrative of redemption and Christ’s mission.

Chapters

  • 00:00:07 Introduction
  • 00:06:31 Jesus’ Temptation in the Wilderness
  • 00:10:46 Myth and the Liberal Interpretation of Scripture
  • 00:19:08 Matthew 12 and the Binding of the Strong Man
  • 00:27:16 Eschatology and the Kingdom of God
  • 00:30:28 The Impeccability of Jesus
  • 00:51:34 Jesus Historically Casts Out Demons
  • 00:53:28 The Holy Spirit, Messianic Sonship, and the Kingdom of God
  • 00:59:00 Practical Applications of Jesus’ Temptation
  • 01:05:34 Conclusion

Participants: ,

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In this installment of Vos Group Lane Tipton and Camden Bucey discuss pp 330 333 of Geerhardus Vos book Biblical Theology Old and New Testaments In this section Vos focuses ...Christology,NewTestament,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #84 — John the Baptist’s Testimony of Jesus http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc829/ Fri, 17 Nov 2023 18:00:11 +0000 https://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=41782 In this installment of Vos Group, Lane Tipton and Camden Bucey discuss pp. 322–329 of Geerhardus Vos’ book, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments. In this section, Vos discusses John’s testimony of Jesus after his baptism. The testimony of John the Baptist as depicted in the Gospel of John emphasizes Jesus’ unique divine nature and […]]]>

In this installment of Vos Group, Lane Tipton and Camden Bucey discuss pp. 322–329 of Geerhardus Vos’ book, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments. In this section, Vos discusses John’s testimony of Jesus after his baptism.

The testimony of John the Baptist as depicted in the Gospel of John emphasizes Jesus’ unique divine nature and eternal preexistence, distinguishing him from all others in redemptive history. This underlines John’s role as the one preparing the way for Jesus, who fulfills Old Testament prophecies as the sacrificial Lamb of God. It also highlights the immutable deity of Christ, who, despite his incarnation, remains unchanged in his divine person and essence. The narrative showcases Jesus’ baptism as an act of vicarious repentance and affirms his authority to bestow the Spirit, underscoring the theological depth of his identity and mission as witnessed by John the Baptist.

Chapters

  • 00:07 Introduction
  • 07:00 The Pre-Existence of Christ Revealed at His Baptism
  • 12:10 Christ before and after John
  • 15:36 John 1:15, 30
  • 26:12 Malachi 3 and the Trinity
  • 30:43 The Ecumenical Tradition and Scripture
  • 33:42 Divine Relationality
  • 39:32 The Immutability of the Person of the Son
  • 44:16 The Religious Significance of Christ’s Divinity
  • 49:34 Conclusion

Participants: ,

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In this installment of Vos Group Lane Tipton and Camden Bucey discuss pp 322 329 of Geerhardus Vos book Biblical Theology Old and New Testaments In this section Vos discusses ...Gospels,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #83 — John’s Baptism of Jesus http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc820/ Fri, 15 Sep 2023 05:00:00 +0000 https://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=41052 Today, we turn to pages 318–322 of Vos’ Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to explore the baptism of Jesus by John the Baptist. Our goal is to offer a nuanced understanding by identifying both the similarities and differences between John’s baptism of Jesus and the baptisms John performed upon the people. Vos aims to […]]]>

Today, we turn to pages 318–322 of Vos’ Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to explore the baptism of Jesus by John the Baptist. Our goal is to offer a nuanced understanding by identifying both the similarities and differences between John’s baptism of Jesus and the baptisms John performed upon the people.

Vos aims to steer clear of two misconceptions: the first being that Jesus’ baptism and the people’s baptisms were entirely distinct events, and the second that they were essentially the same.

The baptism of Jesus holds dual significance. Firstly, it serves as a public and objective revelation of the Holy Spirit’s glory, manifested as the Spirit descended from heaven onto Jesus. Secondly, it has a sacramental meaning for Jesus himself, as he received something from the Spirit that furthered his earthly mission, which was a journey of suffering leading to glory.

In addition, we’ll examine the connection between Jesus’s baptism and his role as the Messiah, offering insights into both pneumatology—the study of the Holy Spirit—and eschatology—the study of end times.

Chapters

  • 00:07 Introduction
  • 00:37 Discussing the Recent Course on Aquinas’ Trinitarian Theology
  • 09:49 John’s Baptism of Jesus
  • 23:22 The Redemptive-Historical Roles of Jesus and John
  • 27:05 Jesus Identifies with His People
  • 29:55 The Objective Office of Messiah
  • 41:42 The Descent of the Spirit upon Jesus
  • 46:54 The Sacramental Significance of Jesus Baptism
  • 50:31 The Beginning of the New Creation
  • 58:49 Conclusion

Participants: ,

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Today we turn to pages 318 322 of Vos Biblical Theology Old and New Testaments to explore the baptism of Jesus by John the Baptist Our goal is to offer ...Baptism,BiblicalTheology,GeerhardusVos,Gospels,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #82 — More on John the Baptist http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc814/ Fri, 04 Aug 2023 05:00:00 +0000 https://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=40596 We turn to pp. 315–318 of Geerhardus Vos’s book, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to discuss revelation connected with John the Baptist. Our discussion examines the complexities of John’s role in the grand scheme of Biblical theology, unearthing profound insights about revelation and prophecy. We explore John’s unique connection with Elijah, and the significance […]]]>

We turn to pp. 315–318 of Geerhardus Vos’s book, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to discuss revelation connected with John the Baptist. Our discussion examines the complexities of John’s role in the grand scheme of Biblical theology, unearthing profound insights about revelation and prophecy. We explore John’s unique connection with Elijah, and the significance of his testimony to Jesus and baptism.

Join us as we ponder Vos’s interpretation of Biblical revelation, shedding light on how it relates to the shadowy figure of John the Baptist. We navigate the delicate interplay between Old Testament prophecy and New Testament fulfillment, guided by the astute scholarship of Vos.

Chapters

  • 00:00:00 Introduction
  • 00:02:49 Thoughts on Studying Vos
  • 00:14:10 John the Baptist and Elijah
  • 00:21:50 Dispensational Interpretations of OT Prophecy
  • 00:30:11 Repent in Preparation of the Coming of Christ
  • 00:34:37 John’s Baptism
  • 00:43:47 The OT Background to the Baptism of John
  • 00:51:27 Considering John’s Baptism Redemptive-Historically
  • 01:01:50 Conclusion

Participants: ,

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We turn to pp 315 318 of Geerhardus Vos s book Biblical Theology Old and New Testaments to discuss revelation connected with John the Baptist Our discussion examines the complexities ...GeerhardusVos,NewTestament,OldTestament,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #80 — Aspects of the Nativity http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc796/ Fri, 31 Mar 2023 05:00:00 +0000 https://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=39279 We turn to pp. 309–310 of Geerhardus Vos’s book, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to discuss aspects of the nativity. The convergence of the coming of Jehovah and the coming of the Messiah is found in Jesus Christ and revealed particularly at the time of the nativity. Two Old Testament roots support this convergence: the circle […]]]>

We turn to pp. 309–310 of Geerhardus Vos’s book, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to discuss aspects of the nativity. The convergence of the coming of Jehovah and the coming of the Messiah is found in Jesus Christ and revealed particularly at the time of the nativity. Two Old Testament roots support this convergence: the circle of Mary and Joseph, who stand in the line of David, and the circle of Zacharias and Elizabeth, where the idea of Jehovah’s coming prevails.

Additionally, Vos notes that the name “Jesus” means “Jehovah is Salvation,” signifying Jesus’ divine identity as the one who delivers his people from the guilt and power of sin. Finally, Vos emphasizes that the inclusion of the Gentiles into God’s covenant people is another important aspect of Jesus’ redemptive work revealed with the incarnation.

Chapters

  • 00:07 Introduction
  • 01:31 The Coming of the Son of David
  • 11:41 The Coming of the Lord
  • 15:43 John the Baptist’s Ministry
  • 21:45 The Name of “Jesus”
  • 27:54 Simeon and the Inclusion of the Gentiles
  • 36:42 Jesus Has No Earthly Father
  • 39:52 Creation and Incarnation
  • 50:09 Conclusion

Participants: ,

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We turn to pp 309 310 of Geerhardus Vos s book Biblical Theology Old and New Testaments to discuss aspects of the nativity The convergence of the coming of Jehovah ...BiblicalTheology,GeerhardusVos,NewTestament,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Running the Race http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc790/ Fri, 17 Feb 2023 06:00:00 +0000 https://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=38711 We discuss Geerhardus Vos’s sermon on Hebrews 12:1–3, “Running the Race,” from his collection Grace and Glory: Sermons Preached at Princeton Seminary. Chapters Participants: Camden Bucey, Danny Olinger, Lane G. Tipton]]>

We discuss Geerhardus Vos’s sermon on Hebrews 12:1–3, “Running the Race,” from his collection Grace and Glory: Sermons Preached at Princeton Seminary.

Chapters

  • 00:07 Introduction
  • 01:11 Historical Context
  • 06:06 Doctrine and Exhortation
  • 18:05 A Cloud of Witnesses
  • 21:19 The Imagery of Running
  • 24:40 Union with the Ascended Christ
  • 29:24 A Grumbling Spirit
  • 38:27 Run the Race with Patience
  • 45:23 The Sermon Ends on an Indicative
  • 53:00 Conclusion

Participants: , ,

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We discuss Geerhardus Vos s sermon on Hebrews 12 1 3 Running the Race from his collection Grace and Glory Sermons Preached at Princeton Seminary https youtu be EEurrJf1zHM Chapters ...BiblicalTheology,GeneralEpistles,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #79 — Aspects of Revelation at the Nativity http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc785/ Fri, 13 Jan 2023 06:00:00 +0000 https://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=38369 We turn to pp. 306–308 of Geerhardus Vos’s book, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to discuss revelation connected with the nativity. From the various texts that range from the annunciation of the angel to Joseph to the prophecy of Anna, Vos takes the “characteristic features” of these narratives and arranges them in a topical manner. Chapters […]]]>

We turn to pp. 306–308 of Geerhardus Vos’s book, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to discuss revelation connected with the nativity. From the various texts that range from the annunciation of the angel to Joseph to the prophecy of Anna, Vos takes the “characteristic features” of these narratives and arranges them in a topical manner.

Chapters

  • 00:07 Introduction
  • 10:32 Continuity with the Old Testament
  • 20:02 Revelation as an Organism
  • 30:29 The New Redemptive Character of Revelation
  • 36:04 The Absence of Political Aspects
  • 47:18 The Absence of Legalism
  • 53:37 Conclusion

Participants: ,

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We turn to pp 306 308 of Geerhardus Vos s book Biblical Theology Old and New Testaments to discuss revelation connected with the nativity From the various texts that range ...Gospels,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #78 — Revelation Connected with the Nativity http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc782/ Fri, 23 Dec 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=38133 We turn to pp. 305–306 of Geerhardus Vos’s book, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to discuss revelation connected with the nativity. Throughout history, God interprets his supernatural works with his inspired Word. At this critical moment in history, the coming of Christ the redeemer, the Lord reveals himself further to his people. Chapters Participants: […]]]>

We turn to pp. 305–306 of Geerhardus Vos’s book, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to discuss revelation connected with the nativity. Throughout history, God interprets his supernatural works with his inspired Word. At this critical moment in history, the coming of Christ the redeemer, the Lord reveals himself further to his people.

Chapters

  • 00:07 Introduction
  • 03:23 The New Testament and Critical Scholarship
  • 12:20 The Incarnation and the History of Special Revelation
  • 19:43 Dogmatic Considerations Regarding the Pre-Existent Messiah
  • 37:46 Supernatural Acts in History
  • 49:14 The Prophecy of Zacharias
  • 54:48 Conclusion

Participants: ,

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We turn to pp 305 306 of Geerhardus Vos s book Biblical Theology Old and New Testaments to discuss revelation connected with the nativity Throughout history God interprets his supernatural ...Christology,NewTestament,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #77 — The Nature of New Testament Revelation http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc770/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=37515 We turn to pp. 302–304 of Geerhardus Vos’s book, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to discuss the nature of New Testament revelation. Vos explains how the new dispensation in Christ is the final dispensation of revelation. Referencing Hebrews 1:1–2, we discuss how this revelation is organic, progressive, and climactic in Christ. Chapters 00:00 Introduction […]]]>

We turn to pp. 302–304 of Geerhardus Vos’s book, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to discuss the nature of New Testament revelation. Vos explains how the new dispensation in Christ is the final dispensation of revelation. Referencing Hebrews 1:1–2, we discuss how this revelation is organic, progressive, and climactic in Christ.

Chapters

  • 00:00 Introduction
  • 05:58 The New Dispensation
  • 07:42 Hebrews 1:1–2
  • 14:33 Organic Revelation
  • 23:01 Progressive Revelation
  • 35:26 Climactic Revelation
  • 45:56 Christ and the Apostles
  • 52:11 Conclusion

Links

Participants: ,

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We turn to pp 302 304 of Geerhardus Vos s book Biblical Theology Old and New Testaments to discuss the nature of New Testament revelation Vos explains how the new ...NewTestament,ScriptureandProlegomena,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #76 — The Structure of New Testament Revelation http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc763/ Fri, 12 Aug 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=36947 We turn to pp. 299–301 of Geerhardus Vos’s book, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments. Vos discusses three ways in which the structure of New Testament Revelation can be determined from within Scripture itself. 1. From indications in the Old Testament2. From the teachings of Jesus3. From the teachings of Paul and the other apostles […]]]>

We turn to pp. 299–301 of Geerhardus Vos’s book, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments. Vos discusses three ways in which the structure of New Testament Revelation can be determined from within Scripture itself.

1. From indications in the Old Testament
2. From the teachings of Jesus
3. From the teachings of Paul and the other apostles

Chapters

  • 00:00:00 Introduction
  • 00:07:43 The Structure of New Testament Revelation
  • 00:15:11 Organic vs. Artificial
  • 00:21:32 Old Testament Indications of the Nature of Revelation
  • 00:27:04 The Old and the New
  • 00:38:23 The Teaching of Jesus
  • 00:43:00 Abrogation and Perfection
  • 00:52:03 Hebrews 10:19-24 and the Era of Religious Fellowship
  • 00:56:58 Paul and the Teaching of the Other Apostles
  • 01:01:21 Hebrews 1:1-2
  • 01:06:06 Conclusion

Participants: ,

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We turn to pp 299 301 of Geerhardus Vos s book Biblical Theology Old and New Testaments Vos discusses three ways in which the structure of New Testament Revelation can ...BiblicalTheology,ScriptureandProlegomena,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Heavenly Mindedness http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc757/ Fri, 01 Jul 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=36428 We discuss Geerhardus Vos’s sermon, “Heavenly Mindedness” from his collection Grace and Glory: Sermons Preached at Princeton Seminary. In this sermon, Vos directs the Christian to consider the heavenly realities, where Christ is, as the proper focus and posture for the Christian throughout this present earthly pilgrimage. Chapters 00:00 Introduction 03:45 Historical Context of the […]]]>

We discuss Geerhardus Vos’s sermon, “Heavenly Mindedness” from his collection Grace and Glory: Sermons Preached at Princeton Seminary. In this sermon, Vos directs the Christian to consider the heavenly realities, where Christ is, as the proper focus and posture for the Christian throughout this present earthly pilgrimage.

Chapters

  • 00:00 Introduction
  • 03:45 Historical Context of the Sermon
  • 08:44 Key Passages on Faith
  • 12:54 A Biblical Theology of Faith
  • 16:11 Faith and the Foundation of the Christian Life
  • 19:58 Vos’s Exegesis and the History of Redemption
  • 22:06 Faith and the Vitality of the Christian Life
  • 23:44 Supernaturalism and History
  • 26:45 Themes Picked up by Kline
  • 30:04 Abraham’s Pilgrimage
  • 36:27 The Remedy for the Ills of the Modern Life
  • 38:40 Heavenly-Mindedness vs Mysticism
  • 48:38 The Means of Grace
  • 57:59 Conclusion

Participants: , ,

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We discuss Geerhardus Vos s sermon Heavenly Mindedness from his collection Grace and Glory Sermons Preached at Princeton Seminary In this sermon Vos directs the Christian to consider the heavenly ...BiblicalTheology,Eschatology,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #75 — The Eschatological View of the Prophets http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc753/ Fri, 03 Jun 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=36207 Lane Tipton and Camden Bucey turn to pages 289–296 of Geerhardus Vos’ book, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments. In this section, Vos introduces several significant interpretive practices which are critical for a proper understanding of the eschatology of the prophets. These are the principles of (1) finality and consummation, (2) prophetic idiom, and (3) […]]]>

Lane Tipton and Camden Bucey turn to pages 289–296 of Geerhardus Vos’ book, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments. In this section, Vos introduces several significant interpretive practices which are critical for a proper understanding of the eschatology of the prophets. These are the principles of (1) finality and consummation, (2) prophetic idiom, and (3) the coming of the Messiah as the “gift of God.”

Chapters

  • 00:00 Introduction
  • 02:48 Finality and Consummation
  • 13:53 The Forshortening of Prophetic Insight
  • 22:54 Prophetic Idiom and the Future Glory of Isaiah
  • 42:58 The Coming Messiah as the Gift of God
  • 51:06 Conclusion

Participants: ,

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Lane Tipton and Camden Bucey turn to pages 289 296 of Geerhardus Vos book Biblical Theology Old and New Testaments In this section Vos introduces several significant interpretive practices which ...GeerhardusVos,Prophets,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #74 — Social Sin http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc740/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 13:48:20 +0000 https://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=35340 Lane Tipton and Camden Bucey turn to pages 269–286 of Geerhardus Vos’ book, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments, to consider social sin in the time of the prophets. Chapters 00:00 Introduction 05:41 Join Our Private Chat Server 10:07 The Corruption of Ritual Worship 11:53 Social Sin 20:34 The Problem of the City 25:54 Social Justice and […]]]>

Lane Tipton and Camden Bucey turn to pages 269–286 of Geerhardus Vos’ book, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments, to consider social sin in the time of the prophets.

Chapters

  • 00:00 Introduction
  • 05:41 Join Our Private Chat Server
  • 10:07 The Corruption of Ritual Worship
  • 11:53 Social Sin
  • 20:34 The Problem of the City
  • 25:54 Social Justice and Humanitarianism
  • 33:48 Social Sin and Theonomy
  • 41:47 Transformation through the New Covenant
  • 50:27 The Old and New Covenants
  • 55:48 Conclusion

Participants: ,

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Lane Tipton and Camden Bucey turn to pages 269 286 of Geerhardus Vos book Biblical Theology Old and New Testaments to consider social sin in the time of the prophets ...Prophets,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group Excursus: The More Excellent Ministry http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc733/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=34908 Danny Olinger, Lane Tipton, and Camden Bucey discuss Geerhardus Vos’s sermon, “The More Excellent Ministry” from 2 Corinthians 3:18. This sermon is included in Grace and Glory: Sermons Preached at Princeton Theological Seminary. In this sermon, Vos proclaims the good news of the consummate and unfading glory of Christ’s new covenant ministry and its implications […]]]>

Danny Olinger, Lane Tipton, and Camden Bucey discuss Geerhardus Vos’s sermon, “The More Excellent Ministry” from 2 Corinthians 3:18. This sermon is included in Grace and Glory: Sermons Preached at Princeton Theological Seminary. In this sermon, Vos proclaims the good news of the consummate and unfading glory of Christ’s new covenant ministry and its implications for the church this side of Christ’s death and resurrection.

Chapters

  • 00:00 Introduction
  • 04:21 The Polemical Context of 2 Corinthians 3
  • 10:59 The New Covenant Ministry
  • 17:08 2 Corinthians 2:14–17 and Christ’s Triumph
  • 28:06 Transitory vs. Eternal
  • 31:32 Covered vs. Uncovered
  • 34:54 The Function of Moses’ Veil
  • 40:13 New Covenant Ministry Is Bound Up with Christ
  • 42:28 A Ministry of Abundant Forgiveness and Righteousness
  • 50:08 The Transforming Power of the New Covenant
  • 53:39 Conclusion

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Danny Olinger Lane Tipton and Camden Bucey discuss Geerhardus Vos s sermon The More Excellent Ministry from 2 Corinthians 3 18 This sermon is included in Grace and Glory Sermons ...NewTestament,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #73 — The Corruption of Ritual Worship (continued) http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc724/ Fri, 12 Nov 2021 05:00:00 +0000 https://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=34495 Lane Tipton and Camden Bucey turn to pages 267–269 of Geerhardus Vos’ book, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments, to consider the collective sin of the nation during the time of the prophets. Vos addresses several passages in this section, including Amos 5:25, Isaiah 1:10–17, and Hosea 6:6. Links OPC Report of the Committee to Study […]]]>

Lane Tipton and Camden Bucey turn to pages 267–269 of Geerhardus Vos’ book, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments, to consider the collective sin of the nation during the time of the prophets. Vos addresses several passages in this section, including Amos 5:25, Isaiah 1:10–17, and Hosea 6:6.

Links

Chapters

  • 00:00 Introduction
  • 05:13 Critics, the Prophets, and the Old Covenant
  • 12:28 The Passover and Redemptive-History
  • 19:32 Amos 5:25
  • 28:33 Isaiah 1:10–17
  • 36:17 Hosea 6:4–10
  • 40:47 Israel’s National Sin
  • 49:06 Conclusion

Participants: ,

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Lane Tipton and Camden Bucey turn to pages 267 269 of Geerhardus Vos book Biblical Theology Old and New Testaments to consider the collective sin of the nation during the ...GeerhardusVos,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #72 — Collective National Sin and the Corruption of Ritual Worship http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc718/ Fri, 01 Oct 2021 04:00:00 +0000 https://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=34210 Lane Tipton and Camden Bucey turn to pages 264–266 of Geerhardus Vos’ book, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments, to consider the collective sin of the nation during the time of the prophets. Vos speaks particularly of the prophet Amos, and his indictment of false worship practices among the people. Links OPC Report of the […]]]>

Lane Tipton and Camden Bucey turn to pages 264–266 of Geerhardus Vos’ book, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments, to consider the collective sin of the nation during the time of the prophets. Vos speaks particularly of the prophet Amos, and his indictment of false worship practices among the people.

Links

Chapters

  • 00:00:00 Introduction
  • 00:09:14 Collective National Sin
  • 00:17:33 Oppression of the Poor and Sexual Immorality
  • 00:24:40 Licentious Idolatry
  • 00:28:24 The Covenant-Historical Context
  • 00:35:26 The Motivation of the Apostates (Amos 8:1–6)
  • 00:42:04 A Critical Interpretation of the Prophets’ View of Sacrifices
  • 00:45:57 Manners of False Worship
  • 00:55:17 Cultural Forces and the Church
  • 01:00:33 Conclusion

Participants: ,

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Lane Tipton and Camden Bucey turn to pages 264 266 of Geerhardus Vos book Biblical Theology Old and New Testaments to consider the collective sin of the nation during the ...GeerhardusVos,Prophets,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #71 — The Rupture of the Bond http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc714/ Fri, 03 Sep 2021 04:00:00 +0000 https://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=33570 We turn to pages 263–264 of Geerhardus Vos’ book, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments, to consider the sin of Israel and the resulting rupture of their covenant bond with the Lord. Links OPC Study Committee Report on Republication, Chapter 8 Participants: Camden Bucey, Lane G. Tipton]]>

We turn to pages 263–264 of Geerhardus Vos’ book, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments, to consider the sin of Israel and the resulting rupture of their covenant bond with the Lord.

Links

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We turn to pages 263 264 of Geerhardus Vos book Biblical Theology Old and New Testaments to consider the sin of Israel and the resulting rupture of their covenant bond ...Prophets,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #70 — The Bond between Jehovah and Israel http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc710/ Fri, 06 Aug 2021 04:00:00 +0000 https://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=33459 We turn to pages 256–263 of Geerhardus Vos’ book, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments, to discuss the bond between the Lord and Israel. In this chapter, Vos considers revelation during the period of the prophets, but in this section, he specifically considers the unique perspective on covenant (berith) offered by Isaiah and Hosea. Participants: […]]]>

We turn to pages 256–263 of Geerhardus Vos’ book, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments, to discuss the bond between the Lord and Israel. In this chapter, Vos considers revelation during the period of the prophets, but in this section, he specifically considers the unique perspective on covenant (berith) offered by Isaiah and Hosea.

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We turn to pages 256 263 of Geerhardus Vos book Biblical Theology Old and New Testaments to discuss the bond between the Lord and Israel In this chapter Vos considers ...Prophets,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #69 — Emotions and Affections http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc698/ Fri, 14 May 2021 04:00:00 +0000 https://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=32224 We turn to pages 255–256 of Geerhardus Vos, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to consider the ways in which the Old Testament prophets use anthropomorphism to describe God. The “emotional” or “affectional” dispositions of Jehovah’s nature is the next set of attributes. He says, as a guiding principle, “we are here in a sphere full of […]]]>

We turn to pages 255–256 of Geerhardus Vos, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to consider the ways in which the Old Testament prophets use anthropomorphism to describe God. The “emotional” or “affectional” dispositions of Jehovah’s nature is the next set of attributes. He says, as a guiding principle, “we are here in a sphere full of anthropomorphism” and says that “an anthropomorphism” is never without an “inner core of important truth” that “must be translated into more theological language” where we can “enrich our knowledge of God” (255).

Vos makes an absolutely critical observation here that needs sustained attention to the theological issues he raises here. They are as important in our day as in Vos’ if not more so. Anthropomorphic language ascribes the qualities of the creature to God’s acts in time. But such language is never intended by Reformed theologians to be taken in a univocal way, as though God literally possesses creaturely qualities.

  1. God’s acts in time do not require him to be temporal.
  2. God acts in the contingent historical order of creation do not require him to be contingent and historical.
  3. God’s acts in relation to mutable and passible creatures do not require that he be mutable and passible like the creature.
  4. There is no point of univocity between the Creator and the creature—no mutual sharing in mutability and temporality.

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We turn to pages 255 256 of Geerhardus Vos Biblical Theology Old and New Testaments to consider the ways in which the Old Testament prophets use anthropomorphism to describe God ...Prophets,Theology(Proper),VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #68 — The Nature and Attributes of Jehovah: Righteousness http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc692/ Fri, 02 Apr 2021 04:00:00 +0000 https://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=31955 We turn to pages 250–255 of Geerhardus Vos, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to consider God’s righteousness—particularly as it is revealed during the time of the Old Testament prophets. Vos speaks of God’s righteousness as “midway between the transcendental and communicative attributes” (250). God is the righteous judge. In human terms, a judge is […]]]>

We turn to pages 250–255 of Geerhardus Vos, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to consider God’s righteousness—particularly as it is revealed during the time of the Old Testament prophets.

Vos speaks of God’s righteousness as “midway between the transcendental and communicative attributes” (250). God is the righteous judge. In human terms, a judge is righteous because he adheres strictly to the standard or law over him. How does this apply to God, who has no standard or law above him? “Underlying the decisions of Jehovah lies His nature” (251). The law is righteous because it is based upon God’s nature, not the other way around.

Vos speaks of God’s forensic or judicial righteousness branching out in several directions, as a righteousness of cognizance, retribution, vindication, salvation, and benevolence.

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We turn to pages 250 255 of Geerhardus Vos Biblical Theology Old and New Testaments to consider God s righteousness particularly as it is revealed during the time of the ...Prophets,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group Excursus: Hungering and Thirsting after Righteousness http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc688/ Fri, 05 Mar 2021 05:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=31270 Danny Olinger, Lane Tipton, and Camden Bucey discuss Geerhardus Vos’s sermon, “Hungering and Thirsting after Righteousness” from Matthew 5:6. This sermon is included in Grace and Glory: Sermons Preached at Princeton Theological Seminary. Participants: Camden Bucey, Danny Olinger, Lane G. Tipton]]>

Danny Olinger, Lane Tipton, and Camden Bucey discuss Geerhardus Vos’s sermon, “Hungering and Thirsting after Righteousness” from Matthew 5:6. This sermon is included in Grace and Glory: Sermons Preached at Princeton Theological Seminary.

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Danny Olinger Lane Tipton and Camden Bucey discuss Geerhardus Vos s sermon Hungering and Thirsting after Righteousness from Matthew 5 6 This sermon is included in Grace and Glory Sermons ...BiblicalTheology,GeerhardusVos,Gospels,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #67: The Holiness of God in the Prophets http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc681/ Fri, 15 Jan 2021 05:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=31062 We turn to pages 245–250 of Geerhardus Vos’s book Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to discuss the prophet’s view of God’s holiness. Vos contrasts the concept of holiness found in pagan religions with that of the biblical prophets. The concept of holiness in Scripture is God-centered. It begins with the Lord, his transcendence, and […]]]>

We turn to pages 245–250 of Geerhardus Vos’s book Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to discuss the prophet’s view of God’s holiness. Vos contrasts the concept of holiness found in pagan religions with that of the biblical prophets. The concept of holiness in Scripture is God-centered. It begins with the Lord, his transcendence, and then radiates outward to creation as he is revealed. This is how we must consider holiness when it is applied to creation—whether to man made in his image, to places, or to consecrated objects used in worship.

The liberal theologians Vos often addresses have no issue acknowledging the “holiness” of man understood as moral goodness. But for Vos, ethical goodness requires the comparison and relation to a holy God. In this sense, it is not possible to de-spiritualize Scripture and retain the Bible’s concept of holiness.

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Vos Group Excursus: The Wonderful Tree http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc673/ Fri, 20 Nov 2020 05:00:16 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=30545 In this episode of Vos Group, we turn to Vos’s sermon, “The Wonderful Tree,” in the collection of his sermons, Grace and Glory: Sermons Preached at Princeton Seminary. Preaching on Hosea 14:8, Vos describes the nature of religion as consisting of what God is for man and of what man is for God. Hosea features […]]]>

In this episode of Vos Group, we turn to Vos’s sermon, “The Wonderful Tree,” in the collection of his sermons, Grace and Glory: Sermons Preached at Princeton Seminary. Preaching on Hosea 14:8, Vos describes the nature of religion as consisting of what God is for man and of what man is for God. Hosea features what God is for man in the metaphor of an evergreen cypress, offering life-giving sustenance and shade in all seasons. This sermon is the longest of Vos’s that we possess, and it demonstrates several surprising features, which Danny Olinger, Lane Tipton, and Camden Bucey discuss.

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In this episode of Vos Group we turn to Vos s sermon The Wonderful Tree in the collection of his sermons Grace and Glory Sermons Preached at Princeton Seminary Preaching ...Preaching,Prophets,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #66 — God’s Relation to Time and Eternity http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc668/ Fri, 16 Oct 2020 04:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=30434 We turn to pages 243–244 of Geerhardus Vos’s book Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to discuss the prophet’s view of God’s relation to time and space. In terms of God’s relation to time and space, two relations occur. What we have to affirm first of all is that God is everywhere present in all […]]]>

We turn to pages 243–244 of Geerhardus Vos’s book Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to discuss the prophet’s view of God’s relation to time and space. In terms of God’s relation to time and space, two relations occur. What we have to affirm first of all is that God is everywhere present in all of his fullness. But Vos speaks of a special relation to Zion (on earth) and heaven itself as the temple dwelling of God. Two things help us grasp the significance of this: the notion of covenant and the location of the fellowship.

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We turn to pages 243 244 of Geerhardus Vos s book Biblical Theology Old and New Testaments to discuss the prophet s view of God s relation to time and ...GeerhardusVos,Prophets,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group Excursus — Grace and Glory: Sermons of Geerhardus Vos http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc660/ Fri, 21 Aug 2020 04:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=28679 In 1922, Reformed Press published six sermons by Geerhardus Vos in a volume titled Grace and Glory. In 1994, Banner of Truth published the same collection with ten additional sermons, which were discovered and edited by James Dennison. Banner has now brought this full collection back into print with a new edition: Grace and Glory: […]]]>

In 1922, Reformed Press published six sermons by Geerhardus Vos in a volume titled Grace and Glory. In 1994, Banner of Truth published the same collection with ten additional sermons, which were discovered and edited by James Dennison. Banner has now brought this full collection back into print with a new edition: Grace and Glory: Sermons Preached at Princeton Seminary.

Danny Olinger, author of Geerhardus Vos: Reformed Biblical Theologian, Confessional Presbyterian, joins us to speak about Vos’s sermons in their biblical context as well as the historical context in which they were written and delivered. Rev. Olinger is General Secretary for the Committee on Christian Education of the Orthodox Presbyterian Church.

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In 1922 Reformed Press published six sermons by Geerhardus Vos in a volume titled Grace and Glory In 1994 Banner of Truth published the same collection with ten additional sermons ...BiblicalTheology,Preaching,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #65 — The Nature and Attributes of God http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc658/ Fri, 07 Aug 2020 04:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=28299 We turn to pp. 238–243 of Vos’s book, Biblical Theology, to speak about the Old Testament prophets and their understanding of the nature and attributes of God. Vos affirms that God is Spirit. This brings into view not that God is immaterial per se, as Vos notes, but rather the “energy of life in God.” […]]]>

We turn to pp. 238–243 of Vos’s book, Biblical Theology, to speak about the Old Testament prophets and their understanding of the nature and attributes of God. Vos affirms that God is Spirit. This brings into view not that God is immaterial per se, as Vos notes, but rather the “energy of life in God.” This is critical to appreciate. That God is Spirit reminds us that while he is immutable in his being, he is impassible in his actions.

He acts, and his actions condition all that he acts upon, without he himself being mutually conditioned by that on which he acts. That is, God is pure act in the sense that he immutably and sovereignly acts in such a way that he is not acted upon, and in that action, changed by the creation on which and in which his actions terminate. Vos says in his Reformed Dogmatics, there is no time distinction in God, yet his acts fall in time. And they fall in time as the acts of an all-conditioning God, who is living and active, but in a way that he is not acted upon or changed by the creature.

The Westminster Shorter Catechism states that God is a Spirit, “infinite, eternal and unchangeable.” This helpfully distills the essence of what Vos is after. While immutable, God is active and living and all of his acts express his immutable being and purpose. So, a key here is that immutability and spirituality require one another: God is immutable in his life; immutable in his purposes; and his agency in creation expresses immutable but living and acting Trinitarian persons, who are exhaustively and entirely the one true God.

Isaiah 57:15 is a key text: “For thus says the One who is high and lifted up, who inhabits eternity, whose name is Holy: ‘I dwell in the high and holy place, and also with him who is of a contrite and lowly spirit, to revive the spirit of the lowly, and to revive the heart of the contrite.’”

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We turn to pp 238 243 of Vos s book Biblical Theology to speak about the Old Testament prophets and their understanding of the nature and attributes of God Vos ...GeerhardusVos,Prophets,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #64 — The Prophets and Monotheism http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc653/ http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc653/#respond Fri, 03 Jul 2020 04:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=27159 We turn to pp. 235–238 of Vos’s book, Biblical Theology, to speak about the Old Testament prophets and varying views of monotheism. The prophetic era begins with Samuel and the introduction of kingship in the theocracy, and the fundamental conflict between the prophets and the kings is between those who are fundamentally theocentric and those […]]]>

We turn to pp. 235–238 of Vos’s book, Biblical Theology, to speak about the Old Testament prophets and varying views of monotheism. The prophetic era begins with Samuel and the introduction of kingship in the theocracy, and the fundamental conflict between the prophets and the kings is between those who are fundamentally theocentric and those who are fundamentally political.

And the kings concerns, representative in Saul, is a carnal, earthly concern to maintain political power. The kings long to maintain the appearance of royal splendor. They do not have a fundamentally theocentric concern about them. The increasing propension of the kings is to gain and maintain political power, outward glory, and the prestige and praise of man. Saul is the prototype of this thing. The theocracy, for the kings who follow in the pattern of Saul, do not perceive the spiritual and theocentric core of the kingdom of God. And they wind up persecuting not only David, but as Stephen makes clear, they persecute and even kill the prophets. But in Isaiah we find the theocentric concern coming to its full fruition in the Old Testament.

Vos notes that there are three unique features that stand out with Isaiah, and these, taken together, comprise the eschatological intensification of the prophetic office—these become a prolepsis of the nature of the true religion that will come by the Spirit of the ascended Messiah. First, a vivid perception of divine majesty. Second, transcendence and majesty of Jehovah in contrast to the creature. Third, unqualified service to the divine glory, which is a common theme pre- and post-exile.

The monotheism of the later prophets such as Isaiah is a sign of the great advancement of the kingdom toward the original heavenly telos that was held out to Adam under the covenant of works. The monotheism of the later prophets such as Isaiah is the movement toward the great realization of the heavenly kingdom in the person and work of Christ.

As we discuss monotheism it is not the “ethical monotheism” of the critics but the eschatological monotheism of the true religion whose center of gravity is God’s glory in heaven that comes into view. That is the fundamental concern—the central importance—of the development of monotheism. The “gods” are absolutely powerless to deliver from judgment on earth or to enable entrance into the glory-heaven of Jehovah.

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http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc653/feed/ 0 We turn to pp 235 238 of Vos s book Biblical Theology to speak about the Old Testament prophets and varying views of monotheism The prophetic era begins with Samuel ...Prophets,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #63 — The Prophets and the Nature of God http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc650/ http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc650/#respond Fri, 12 Jun 2020 04:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=26927 We turn to pp. 234–235 of Vos’s book, Biblical Theology, to speak about the nature and attributes of God as understand by the Old Testament prophets. Participants: Camden Bucey, Lane G. Tipton]]>

We turn to pp. 234–235 of Vos’s book, Biblical Theology, to speak about the nature and attributes of God as understand by the Old Testament prophets.

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http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc650/feed/ 0 We turn to pp 234 235 of Vos s book Biblical Theology to speak about the nature and attributes of God as understand by the Old Testament prophets https vimeo ...Prophets,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #62 — The Content of the Prophetic Revelation http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc646/ http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc646/#respond Fri, 15 May 2020 04:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=26674 We turn to page 234 of Vos’s book, Biblical Theology, to speak about the understanding of monotheism which the biblical prophets possessed. On pages 206–211 of the book, Vos dealt with the modernist conception of the issue, adding a footnote that his positive treatment would be saved for later. Now we arrive at that later portion. […]]]>

We turn to page 234 of Vos’s book, Biblical Theology, to speak about the understanding of monotheism which the biblical prophets possessed. On pages 206–211 of the book, Vos dealt with the modernist conception of the issue, adding a footnote that his positive treatment would be saved for later. Now we arrive at that later portion. As we begin to address this new section, we revisit some of the ground we covered in Vos Group #55, while expanding that material.

On pages 206–211, Vos gives us the key conception of the modernist critics:

The prophets, from Amos and Hosea onwards, are credited with the discovery and establishment of the great truth of ethical monotheism, in which the distinctive and permanent value of Old Testament religion is to be found.

To explain this as crisply as possible, Vos is saying that a particular ethical conception of Jehovah gives rise to the monotheism of the later prophets in the 8th century. It is a monotheism of a particular kind–a monotheism of a specific variety. There is a concrete, historical, situated, ethical dilemma that forges an ethical conception of Jehovah that otherwise would not be formed.

In contrast, Vos emphasizes that the prophets are God-centered. They are religious—meaning they find their delight in spiritual (Spirit-wrought) communion with God. The ethical aspect of monotheism is itself subservient to the glory of God and delight in fellowship with God.

The “prophetic orientation” does not view God as a means to an end, but rather delighting in God himself, as he has revealed himself as sovereign Judge and condescended Lord and Savior of his covenant people. The prophets delight in the God they proclaim and do not re-conceive him as a means to an end other than the glory of God himself as the chief end and delight of his people.

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http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc646/feed/ 0 59:44We turn to page 234 of Vos s book Biblical Theology to speak about the understanding of monotheism which the biblical prophets possessed On pages 206 211 of the book ...Prophets,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #61: The Mode of Communication of the Prophecy http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc636/ http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc636/#respond Fri, 06 Mar 2020 05:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=25895 We turn to pages 230–233 of Vos’s book, Biblical Theology, to speak about the mode by which the Lord delivers his message to the prophet. Man is made in the image of God, which means he has a special capacity to commune with God. Vos marvels at the way in which divine speech is transmitted to […]]]>

We turn to pages 230–233 of Vos’s book, Biblical Theology, to speak about the mode by which the Lord delivers his message to the prophet. Man is made in the image of God, which means he has a special capacity to commune with God. Vos marvels at the way in which divine speech is transmitted to those made in his image. God’s word is communicated in servant form without evacuating the message of any of its divine characteristics, such as inerrancy or infallibility. The Holy Spirit works in the prophet in such a way as to inspire and superintend the entire activity of the prophet—whether in speech or inscripturation.

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http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc636/feed/ 0 We turn to pages 230 233 of Vos s book Biblical Theology to speak about the mode by which the Lord delivers his message to the prophet Man is made ...BiblicalTheology,Prophets,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group Excursus: John 20:1–18 — Rabboni http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc632/ http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc632/#comments Fri, 07 Feb 2020 05:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=24113 We take a brief break from our regular schedule in Geerhardus Vos’s book, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments, to discuss Vos’s sermon “Rabboni,” on John 20:16. This sermon is found in Grace & Glory, a collection of Vos’s sermons preached at the chapel of Princeton Seminary. John 20:1–18 (ESV) Now on the first day […]]]>

We take a brief break from our regular schedule in Geerhardus Vos’s book, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments, to discuss Vos’s sermon “Rabboni,” on John 20:16. This sermon is found in Grace & Glory, a collection of Vos’s sermons preached at the chapel of Princeton Seminary.

John 20:1–18 (ESV)

Now on the first day of the week Mary Magdalene came to the tomb early, while it was still dark, and saw that the stone had been taken away from the tomb. So she ran and went to Simon Peter and the other disciple, the one whom Jesus loved, and said to them, “They have taken the Lord out of the tomb, and we do not know where they have laid him.” So Peter went out with the other disciple, and they were going toward the tomb. Both of them were running together, but the other disciple outran Peter and reached the tomb first. And stooping to look in, he saw the linen cloths lying there, but he did not go in. Then Simon Peter came, following him, and went into the tomb. He saw the linen cloths lying there, and the face cloth, which had been on Jesus’ head, not lying with the linen cloths but folded up in a place by itself. Then the other disciple, who had reached the tomb first, also went in, and he saw and believed; for as yet they did not understand the Scripture, that he must rise from the dead. 10 Then the disciples went back to their homes. 

11 But Mary stood weeping outside the tomb, and as she wept she stooped to look into the tomb. 12 And she saw two angels in white, sitting where the body of Jesus had lain, one at the head and one at the feet. 13 They said to her, “Woman, why are you weeping?” She said to them, “They have taken away my Lord, and I do not know where they have laid him.” 14 Having said this, she turned around and saw Jesus standing, but she did not know that it was Jesus. 15 Jesus said to her, “Woman, why are you weeping? Whom are you seeking?” Supposing him to be the gardener, she said to him, “Sir, if you have carried him away, tell me where you have laid him, and I will take him away.” 16 Jesus said to her, “Mary.” She turned and said to him in Aramaic, “Rabboni!” (which means Teacher). 17 Jesus said to her, “Do not cling to me, for I have not yet ascended to the Father; but go to my brothers and say to them, ‘I am ascending to my Father and your Father, to my God and your God.’ ” 18 Mary Magdalene went and announced to the disciples, “I have seen the Lord”—and that he had said these things to her. 

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http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc632/feed/ 1 We take a brief break from our regular schedule in Geerhardus Vos s book Biblical Theology Old and New Testaments to discuss Vos s sermon Rabboni on John 20 16 ...BiblicalTheology,GeerhardusVos,Gospels,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #60 — The Intra-Mental State of the Prophet http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc627/ http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc627/#respond Fri, 03 Jan 2020 05:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=24111 We turn to pages 224–229 of Vos’s book, Biblical Theology, to speak about the intra-mental state of the prophet, by which Vos means to inquire into “how the soul felt and reacted under the things shown within the vision” (p. 224). Far too much attention has been given to what is represented by the Greek term […]]]>

We turn to pages 224–229 of Vos’s book, Biblical Theology, to speak about the intra-mental state of the prophet, by which Vos means to inquire into “how the soul felt and reacted under the things shown within the vision” (p. 224).

Far too much attention has been given to what is represented by the Greek term ecstasis. The term served first as a translation of the Hebrew tardemah (cf. Gen. 2:21 with Adam and Genesis 15:12 with Abram). In Adam’s case, there is no visionary state. In Abram’s case, there is such a vision (expound the theology of the theophany). But tardemah does not throw any light on Abram’s state of mind.

Ecstasis, on the other hand, has a very definite conception in Greek consciousness that leads in the direction of error. That conception is that of “insanity or mania” and was applied to the oracular process—the process of receiving visions and the resultant state in which it put the seer-prophet. This led to a close association between the prophet and some feature of instability—some manic tendency that seems inherent to the process of receiving a vision.

Vos points us to God’s inspired, inerrant, and infallible revelation in history, which does not bypass the human mind or allow the recipient to escape his humanity, but elevates him to greater communion with God.

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http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc627/feed/ 0 We turn to pages 224 229 of Vos s book Biblical Theology to speak about the intra mental state of the prophet by which Vos means to inquire into how ...BiblicalTheology,GeerhardusVos,Prophets,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #59 — Revelation through Showing and Seeing http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc624/ http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc624/#comments Fri, 13 Dec 2019 05:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=22736 In this episode, we turn to pages 220–223 of Vos’s book, Biblical Theology, to discuss the reception of divine revelation through showing and seeing. The prophets were given visions and heard the Lord and angelic beings speaking to them audibly. We explore the significance of this fact with regard to our understanding of God’s progressive revelation […]]]>

In this episode, we turn to pages 220–223 of Vos’s book, Biblical Theology, to discuss the reception of divine revelation through showing and seeing. The prophets were given visions and heard the Lord and angelic beings speaking to them audibly. We explore the significance of this fact with regard to our understanding of God’s progressive revelation in history.

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http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc624/feed/ 1 In this episode we turn to pages 220 223 of Vos s book Biblical Theology to discuss the reception of divine revelation through showing and seeing The prophets were given ...Prophets,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #58 — Revelation through Speech and Hearing http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc611/ http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc611/#comments Fri, 13 Sep 2019 04:00:18 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=19729 In this episode, we turn to pages 216–220 of Vos’s book, Biblical Theology, to discuss the reception of divine revelation through speech and hearing. Vos treats this topic because, among other things, it lies at the heart of true religion. If God is not speaking, then we do not know him. If it is merely […]]]>

In this episode, we turn to pages 216–220 of Vos’s book, Biblical Theology, to discuss the reception of divine revelation through speech and hearing. Vos treats this topic because, among other things, it lies at the heart of true religion. If God is not speaking, then we do not know him. If it is merely men who speak, we do not know God and therefore are not in a religious bond of covenantal fellowship with him. It is of the essence of true religion to affirm that God speaks and that prophets hear God speaking and then speak that same Word to the church. You cannot have true religion without such supernatural verbal revelation.

This requires that God speaks to the prophet before the prophet spoke. This is critical, since it utterly destroys the liberal theories that locate the actual words in human agency alone, such as the kernel theory we talked about earlier. The speaking of God is not meant in a figurative way, “but in the literal sense it appears in various ways” (p. 217).

Vos next makes a point that the verbal communication from Jehovah is both external and internal, and that internal (to the soul or audible only to the prophet) does not collapse into the “consciousness theology” and the subjectivism of the liberal concept of “revelation” where revelation simply means a heightened moral consciousness or awareness of nearness to the ethical ideal of the prophetic religion.

Vos urges us not to probe the proportion of internal and external revelation, but to accept that both forms come to the prophets, making them bearers of words that have divine authority.

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http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc611/feed/ 1 In this episode we turn to pages 216 220 of Vos s book Biblical Theology to discuss the reception of divine revelation through speech and hearing Vos treats this topic ...BiblicalTheology,Prophets,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #57 — Objective Revelation to the Prophets http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc606/ http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc606/#respond Fri, 09 Aug 2019 04:00:55 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=18948 We turn to pages 214–216 of Geerhardus Vos’s book, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments, to discuss the kernel and divination theories of the reception of prophetic revelation. Critical scholars seek to identify human beings as the origin of the prophetic message. Vos defends the orthodox notion that God reveals himself in objective verbal revelation […]]]>

We turn to pages 214–216 of Geerhardus Vos’s book, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments, to discuss the kernel and divination theories of the reception of prophetic revelation. Critical scholars seek to identify human beings as the origin of the prophetic message. Vos defends the orthodox notion that God reveals himself in objective verbal revelation to the prophets, who delivered that inspired and inerrant message to the people.

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http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc606/feed/ 0 We turn to pages 214 216 of Geerhardus Vos s book Biblical Theology Old and New Testaments to discuss the kernel and divination theories of the reception of prophetic revelation ...BiblicalTheology,ScriptureandProlegomena,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #56 — The Mode of Reception of the Prophetic Revelation http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc601/ http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc601/#respond Fri, 05 Jul 2019 04:00:41 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=17699 We turn to pages 212–213 of Vos’ book Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to discuss the mode of reception of the prophetic revelation. In the fourth section of his book, Vos continues to contrast the modernist conception with that of confessional orthodoxy. He stresses that revelation does not originate naturally but is in its essence, […]]]>

We turn to pages 212–213 of Vos’ book Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to discuss the mode of reception of the prophetic revelation. In the fourth section of his book, Vos continues to contrast the modernist conception with that of confessional orthodoxy. He stresses that revelation does not originate naturally but is in its essence, “a real communication” from God to the prophets.

Our study of Vos is focused on biblical theology, or what Vos termed “the history of special revelation.” A modernized conception of revelation construes history as natural and mechanical in character. History is encased in patterns of natural cause and effect. It is a closed reality. For the Kantian, the mind of man imposes rational categories onto nature. Others view the mind and discovering natural and immutable laws, which don’t exhibit any variation. It is an anti-supernaturalist conception of history. For the modernist, supernatural revelation cannot exist in the sphere of natural history.

Vos, however, is unwavering in his commitment to the self-attesting word of God, which is a supernatural word from the transcendent God, who nevertheless condescends voluntarily to speak to those made in his image.

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http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc601/feed/ 0 We turn to pages 212 213 of Vos book Biblical Theology Old and New Testaments to discuss the mode of reception of the prophetic revelation In the fourth section of ...BiblicalTheology,Prophets,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #55 — Did the Later Prophets Create an Ethical Monotheism? http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc597/ http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc597/#respond Fri, 07 Jun 2019 04:00:59 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=14290 We turn to pages 206–211 of Vos’ book Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to continue our discussion of critical theories of prophetism. Vos tackles a modernist, critical theory of the development of monotheism under the prophets. Vos wants the reader to enter into a modernist world–a critical world. In that world, there are three […]]]>

We turn to pages 206–211 of Vos’ book Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to continue our discussion of critical theories of prophetism. Vos tackles a modernist, critical theory of the development of monotheism under the prophets. Vos wants the reader to enter into a modernist world–a critical world. In that world, there are three main things you will face:

  • A finite and developing conception of deity
  • A mechanical and purely natural conception of history
  • An errant and merely human conception of the Bible

These are the key features of a “critical” approach to the prophets. But, as Machen pointed out so clearly, these three conceptions represent a different religion: a fundamentally Pelagian conception of religion.

Vos helps us see, by contrast, that the kingdom of God and the demand that he be worshipped exclusively is built into man as the image of God. Adam, from the start, was bound to God in a religious relation by creation that the covenant of works was to advance. Man, from the beginning, exists to worship God–to glorify and enjoy God forever in covenantal fellowship. For the liberal to reverse this relation and insist that God must serve the purpose of man is to lay bare that the critics truly do have a different religion. On this, Vos and Machen are one.

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http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc597/feed/ 0 We turn to pages 206 211 of Vos book Biblical Theology Old and New Testaments to continue our discussion of critical theories of prophetism Vos tackles a modernist critical theory ...Prophets,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #54 — The Origin of “Nabhi-ism” in Israel http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc590/ http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc590/#comments Fri, 19 Apr 2019 04:00:12 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=13658 We turn to pages 202–205 of Vos’ book Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to continue our discussion of critical theories of prophetism. Vos answers critics who believe that Israel derived its understanding of prophetism from Canaanite religion by focusing our attention upon God’s word revealed in history. Contrary to the false prophets, true prophetism […]]]>

We turn to pages 202–205 of Vos’ book Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to continue our discussion of critical theories of prophetism. Vos answers critics who believe that Israel derived its understanding of prophetism from Canaanite religion by focusing our attention upon God’s word revealed in history. Contrary to the false prophets, true prophetism is centered on true religion, union and communion with God according to his word.

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http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc590/feed/ 1 We turn to pages 202 205 of Vos book Biblical Theology Old and New Testaments to continue our discussion of critical theories of prophetism Vos answers critics who believe that ...BiblicalTheology,Prophets,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #53 — The Influence of Geerhardus Vos http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc584/ http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc584/#respond Fri, 08 Mar 2019 05:00:07 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=13186 Danny Olinger, author of Geerhardus Vos: Reformed Biblical Theology, Confessional Presbyterian, joins us for a special conversation. We take a brief break from Vos’s book Biblical Theology to discuss the influence of Vos upon several other theologians. We then open the floor to questions from people participating in our live webinar. Participants: Camden Bucey, Danny […]]]>

Danny Olinger, author of Geerhardus Vos: Reformed Biblical Theology, Confessional Presbyterian, joins us for a special conversation. We take a brief break from Vos’s book Biblical Theology to discuss the influence of Vos upon several other theologians. We then open the floor to questions from people participating in our live webinar.

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http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc584/feed/ 0 Danny Olinger author of Geerhardus Vos Reformed Biblical Theology Confessional Presbyterian joins us for a special conversation We take a brief break from Vos s book Biblical Theology to discuss ...BiblicalTheology,GeerhardusVos,ModernChurch,SystematicTheology,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #52 — Prophets and Sons of Prophets http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc581/ http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc581/#comments Fri, 15 Feb 2019 05:00:01 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=13008 In this episode of #VosGroup, we turn to pages 200–201 of Vos’ book Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to continue our discussion of critical theories of prophetism. Participants: Camden Bucey, Lane G. Tipton]]>

In this episode of #VosGroup, we turn to pages 200–201 of Vos’ book Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to continue our discussion of critical theories of prophetism.

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http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc581/feed/ 1 In this episode of VosGroup we turn to pages 200 201 of Vos book Biblical Theology Old and New Testaments to continue our discussion of critical theories of prophetism https ...BiblicalTheology,Prophets,ScriptureandProlegomena,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #51 — The History of Prophetism: Critical Theories http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc574/ http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc574/#comments Fri, 28 Dec 2018 05:00:39 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=12456 In this installment of #VosGroup, we turn to pages 198–199 of Vos’ book Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to consider critical theories of prophetism. We extend and amplify the material in these pages more than usual by connecting Vos’s teaching to the theology of Karl Barth and other modernist approaches. Broadly, the term can […]]]>

In this installment of #VosGroup, we turn to pages 198–199 of Vos’ book Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to consider critical theories of prophetism. We extend and amplify the material in these pages more than usual by connecting Vos’s teaching to the theology of Karl Barth and other modernist approaches.

Broadly, the term can be associated with “instrument of revelation” and this is so important to note. For Vos, contra Barth, there is a direct, organic disclosure of God’s revealed truth in our calendar-time history. It is not in a distinct, third-time dimension that Barth calls Geschichte that “revelation” occurs. For Barth, revelation is Jesus Christ in a distinct time dimension, God’s third time for us, that “revelation” occurs. Revelation is Jesus Christ. The Scriptures, the prophets and calendar time history are not themselves revelation–they only point to revelation. Revelation is a “supra-historical” event in a time dimension altogether different from our calendar time.

But Vos would say this is fundamentally wrong–it is a different religious conception of “revelation” altogether. God speaks directly to Adam in the Garden of Eden in terms of positive, special, verbal revelation. God’s voice can be heard, speaking with inerrant and inescapable authority, in Eden. It is this initial self-revelation from God, in the Garden of Eden, prior to the fall, that supplies us with our conception of revelation. God both acts and speaks in calendar time history, and that special is initially given to Adam under the covenant of works. God’s revelation in nature (image of God) is by divine design subordinate to God’s revelation in positive categories. In other words, Genesis 2:7 (image of God) and Genesis 2:15–17 (Covenant) demand the idea that God reveals himself with absolute authority and clarity directly in history.

Vos says, “But the Reformed have always insisted upon it that at no point shall a recognition of the historical delivery and apprehension of truth be permitted to degenerate into a relativity of truth. The history remains a history of revelation. Its total product agrees absolutely in every respect with the sum of truth as it lies in the eternal mind and purpose of God.”

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http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc574/feed/ 1 In this installment of VosGroup we turn to pages 198 199 of Vos book Biblical Theology Old and New Testaments to consider critical theories of prophetism We extend and amplify ...BiblicalTheology,Prophets,ScriptureandProlegomena,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #50 — Biblical and Greek Conceptions of Prophetism http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc568/ http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc568/#comments Fri, 16 Nov 2018 05:00:57 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=11811 We continue our #VosGroup series in pages 194–197 of Vos’ book Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to consider the biblical conception of prophetism. We discuss the Greek and pagan conceptions and their connection to contemporary modernist conceptions. Vos has in view here a Hellenic, and not New Testament, conception of the prophet. Some would […]]]>

We continue our #VosGroup series in pages 194–197 of Vos’ book Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to consider the biblical conception of prophetism. We discuss the Greek and pagan conceptions and their connection to contemporary modernist conceptions.

Vos has in view here a Hellenic, and not New Testament, conception of the prophet. Some would seek to understand prophet as a foreteller, which brings into view predictive prophecy—a telling of a situation in advance of the actual occurrence of the situation. However, it is not proper to take the concept in this direction only. While there is a predictive element present in much of what the prophets communicate, it is better to take them as foretellers in a local sense. This means that prophet is one who speaks an oracle from God. It is a place in time where one speaks on behalf of God.

However, the Greek terms, as it appears in a Hellenic, extra-biblical context, has a different connotation, and this is critical to grasp, that we must reject. That connotation is this: the prophet in this Greek conception is an interpreter of a fundamentally opaque, hidden utterance from god. Pythia (the name of the high priestess of the temple Apollo at Delphi), would be the interpreter of this fundamentally hidden oracle—a dark saying that needed a human interpreter in order to be rendered intelligible.

The Greek prophet does not stand in a direct relation to the deity, as in the Old Testament prophet, who spoke, by inspiration, directly from God, a word from God. Rather than being a mouth-piece of the deity, as is the case with the Nabi, the prophet in the Old Testament sense of the term, the prophet in the Greek, Hellenic sense, is an interpreter of the deity’s oracle. The oracle comes from the Deity but requires interpretation, an interpretive act, from a prophet, to render that message intelligible or clear. The prophet, in this Hellenic conception, is therefore not one who speaks the words of the deity. Rather, he is one who intercepts a supra-rational, intrinsically opaque, communication from a deity. It is precisely this conception of the prophet that Vos sees being appropriated by the liberals of his day.

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http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc568/feed/ 2 We continue our VosGroup series in pages 194 197 of Vos book Biblical Theology Old and New Testaments to consider the biblical conception of prophetism We discuss the Greek and ...Prophets,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #49 — The Conception of a Prophet: Names and Etymologies http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc562/ http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc562/#comments Fri, 05 Oct 2018 04:00:58 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=11234 We continue our #VosGroup series in pages 191–194 of Vos’ book Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to consider the biblical conception of prophetism. Vos beings by considering critical theories of prophetism based on the term “prophet.” Vos instructs us that all quests for seeking the conception of the prophet in etymology, rather in the […]]]>

We continue our #VosGroup series in pages 191–194 of Vos’ book Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to consider the biblical conception of prophetism. Vos beings by considering critical theories of prophetism based on the term “prophet.” Vos instructs us that all quests for seeking the conception of the prophet in etymology, rather in the teaching of the text, the meaning and function of Nabi (the Hebrew word for prophet) in the biblical text, are fraught with uncertainty and speculation. This is always the case when you seek to find the meaning of the text behind it in a critically reconstructed theory of the origin of the meaning in the text itself. Of course, if you want to say that the text takes you to what is behind it—the history of special deed revelation which the word revelation interprets, that is fine, even critical to affirm. But what Vos is helping us see is that we do not seek to find the meaning of the biblical text in a critical reconstruction of what sources we think might yield the meaning “behind” the text. Such an approach, characteristic of the modernist scholarship in Vos’ day (and continuing in our day) strips authority from the biblical text and makes it a fallible window through which we seek to get “behind” the text to its true historically reconstructed sources. Such an approach divests the Scripture of its revelatory character and intrinsic authority. The point: “even to the pre-Mosaic Hebrew consciousness a nabhi is an authorized spokesman for the Deity, and that in his word a divinely-communicated power resides” (193). Contrary to the modernist conception of the prophet as an insightful, inspiring religious genius who shares his mysterious insight into the divine (and therefore is an ethical example for us), the prophet is first and foremost one who receives and is authorized to transmit (to speak and write) the Word of God do you have the prophet. All the emphasis lies on the actual speaking, the true communicating, of something out in the open, where it reaches the mind of man and directs him in his religious fellowship bond with God. It is there that you find the essence of the prophet’s activity. It is not the mere passive reception of some ineffable mystery; it is the open declaration of the oracles of God—words from God that address God’s people in covenant fellowship with Himself. Vos is warning us, once again, of the errors of Liberalism or Modernism—where the trend is always to reduce the Scriptures and the prophets in this case, to a record of religious experience–religious feeling set forth in speech. Rather, the Scriptures in general and the prophets in particular bring into view the supernatural approach of God for fellowship with his covenant people, as that relation is rooted in the substance of what the prophets will proclaim–Christ crucified and Christ raised (I Peter 1:10–12). The point, as we move toward unpacking that gospel content, is that God speaks to his people for the purpose of consummating a redemptive bond of fellowship—communion in covenant—that lies at the core of our religious relation to God.

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http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc562/feed/ 6 48:17We continue our VosGroup series in pages 191 194 of Vos book Biblical Theology Old and New Testaments to consider the biblical conception of prophetism Vos beings by considering critical ...BiblicalTheology,OldTestament,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #48 — The Word as the Instrument of Prophetism http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc554/ http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc554/#respond Fri, 10 Aug 2018 04:00:49 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=10527 We continue our #VosGroup series in pages 187–190 of Vos’ book Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to consider the word of God and prophetism. Prophetism is restricted to the word as its instrument. The prophetic ministry was a declarative, spiritual authority of one who speaks and writes in the words of Jehovah himself. There is […]]]>

We continue our #VosGroup series in pages 187–190 of Vos’ book Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to consider the word of God and prophetism. Prophetism is restricted to the word as its instrument. The prophetic ministry was a declarative, spiritual authority of one who speaks and writes in the words of Jehovah himself. There is the closest possible connection, then, between the prophetic office and the declaration of the Word of the Lord, as that Word is given by the superintending agency of the Spirit, who breathes out the prophetic Scriptures (cf. 1 Pet. 1:10–11; 2 Tim. 3:16). The effect of being restricted to the ministry of the Word of God was a heightening of the “spiritualizing” relation between Jehovah and Israel.

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http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc554/feed/ 0 We continue our VosGroup series in pages 187 190 of Vos book Biblical Theology Old and New Testaments to consider the word of God and prophetism Prophetism is restricted to ...BiblicalTheology,Prophets,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #47 — The Place of Prophetism in Old Testament Revelation http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc549/ http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc549/#comments Fri, 06 Jul 2018 04:00:01 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=10204 We continue our #VosGroup series in pages 185–188 of Vos’ book Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to consider the unfolding of God’s plan as it moves from the period under Moses to that of the prophets. Prophetism marks an epochal movement in OT revelation. In other words, the “new happenings” of God’s mighty deeds […]]]>

We continue our #VosGroup series in pages 185–188 of Vos’ book Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to consider the unfolding of God’s plan as it moves from the period under Moses to that of the prophets. Prophetism marks an epochal movement in OT revelation. In other words, the “new happenings” of God’s mighty deeds in redemptive revelation bring enduring advancement toward consummation—each epoch builds upon and brings advancement to what has proceeded. The new feature is “the organization of the theocratic kingdom under a human ruler” (185). God is seeking to confer himself on a holy people through a holy king in a holy theocratic realm. As such, Prophetism is a “Kingdom-Producing Movement (186–187). This is a critical point to grasp: prophetism is attached to the advancement of the theocratic kingdom. Prophetism therefore has no independent significance. Its entire rationale grows out of the producing and advancement of the theocratic kingdom of Jehovah. This comes into even greater clarity as we recognize that the Word is the instrument of Prophetism (187–88). The essence, formally, of prophetism is that it “restricts” itself to the Word of God—the Word from the mouth of Jehovah. The Word of God “in reality did more than anything else towards the spiritualizing of the relation between Jehovah and Israel” (187).

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http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc549/feed/ 2 59:43We continue our VosGroup series in pages 185 188 of Vos book Biblical Theology Old and New Testaments to consider the unfolding of God s plan as it moves from ...BiblicalTheology,Prophets,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #46 — Summary of Revelation in the Period of Moses http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc545/ http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc545/#respond Fri, 08 Jun 2018 04:00:11 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=9938 We continue our #VosGroup series in pages 175–182 of Vos’ book Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to consider ancestor worship and animism before moving to a summary of Part I of the entire book and specifically, revelation during the period of Moses. The movement from the Abrahamic to the Mosaic is a movement from […]]]>

We continue our #VosGroup series in pages 175–182 of Vos’ book Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to consider ancestor worship and animism before moving to a summary of Part I of the entire book and specifically, revelation during the period of Moses. The movement from the Abrahamic to the Mosaic is a movement from lesser to greater directness of access to God. This “greater access” appears especially when we consider what Vos called the “typical proportions” that Moses acquires in an “unusual degree” of Moses. And Exodus 32–34 is key in this regard. Not only does Moses offer himself vicariously to make atonement for sin (Ex. 32:30–33), illustrating the Melchizedekian priesthood of Christ, but he gains access to God in an unprecedented way. God promises Moses “the divine presence and rest” in the land (33:12–14). God speaks to Moses “face-to-face (33:11)” in the tent of meeting and shows Moses his “glory” as he hides him in the cleft of the rock and declares his name (33:14-20). What Abraham saw in the form of a smoking firepot and a blazing torch, Moses sees in fellowship on a mountain—a mountain that looks back to the mountain of Eden and upward and forward to Mount Zion. The essence of the covenant bond—the secret of God’s friendship—is with Moses in a unique way, as a sort of first-fruits in the Old Covenant. Moses sees God, knows God, fellowships with God. In fact, Exodus 34:27ff. Moses is on the mountain with God for 40 days and nights without food or water and his transformed in his countenance. He does not live by bread alone but by every word that comes from the mouth of God. A second major theme that Vos develops is that the tabernacle is a concentrated theocracy. That is to say, the tabernacle dwelling of God is the end to which the entire Exodus aspires–the reality to which it is directed. Finally, all of this conspires to help us recognize that the sacrificial system is a means to a higher end of fellowship with God.

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http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc545/feed/ 0 55:11We continue our VosGroup series in pages 175 182 of Vos book Biblical Theology Old and New Testaments to consider ancestor worship and animism before moving to a summary of ...BiblicalTheology,Pentateuch,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #45 — Excursus: Reformed Dogmatics http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc537/ http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc537/#comments Fri, 13 Apr 2018 04:00:34 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=9235 Vos Group takes an excursus to discuss Vos’s Reformed Dogmatics. In this series, like all of his works, Vos presents the “deeper Protestant conception” of covenantal union and communion with the Triune God. We discuss how the immutable Creator does not change in the freely willed “new relation” to creation—only creation does, and that the […]]]>

Vos Group takes an excursus to discuss Vos’s Reformed Dogmatics. In this series, like all of his works, Vos presents the “deeper Protestant conception” of covenantal union and communion with the Triune God. We discuss how the immutable Creator does not change in the freely willed “new relation” to creation—only creation does, and that the Roman Catholic view of the image cannot deliver the “essence” of religion, which is communion with God.

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http://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc537/feed/ 9 58:41Vos Group takes an excursus to discuss Vos s Reformed Dogmatics In this series like all of his works Vos presents the deeper Protestant conception of covenantal union and communion ...BiblicalTheology,Theology(Proper),VosGroupReformed Forumnono