Reformed Forum https://reformedforum.org Reformed Theological Resources Tue, 19 May 2020 17:14:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.4.1 https://reformedforum.org/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2020/04/cropped-reformed-forum-logo-300dpi-side_by_side-1-32x32.png Reformed Forum https://reformedforum.org 32 32 Reformed Forumhttp://traffic.libsyn.com/reformedforum/reformed_forum_album3000.pnghttp://reformedforum.org/144144Reformed Forum podcast art.Reformed Forumno Reformed Forum mail@reformedforum.org The Theology of Benedict XVI https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc647/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc647/#respond Fri, 22 May 2020 04:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=26680 Dr. Gregg Allison and Dr. Carl Trueman speak about the theology of Benedict XVI, pope emeritus of the Roman Catholic Church. Allison’s article, “Faith, Hope, and Love” and Trueman’s article, “Is the Pope (Roman) Catholic?,” are published in The Theology of Benedict XVI: A Protestant Appreciation edited by Tim Perry and published by Lexham Press.

Dr. Allison is Professor of Christian Theology at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky. He is the author or co-author of several books, including Roman Catholic Theology and Practice: An Evangelical Assessment and The Unfinished Reformation: What Unites and Divides Catholics and Protestants after 500 Years. He appeared on Christ the Center episodes 363 and 461.

Dr. Trueman is Professor of Biblical and Religious Studies at Grove City College in Grove City, Pennsylvania. He hosts the Mortification of Spin podcast with Aimee Byrd and Todd Pruitt. He is also the author of several books, including The Creedal Imperative and Luther on the Christian Life. Dr. Trueman has joined us many times before.

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc647/feed/ 0 Dr Gregg Allison and Dr Carl Trueman speak about the theology of Benedict XVI pope emeritus of the Roman Catholic Church Allison s article Faith Hope and Love and Trueman ...SystematicTheologyReformed Forumnono
The Kingdom of God and Abraham https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp197/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp197/#respond Tue, 19 May 2020 17:14:11 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=26705 This week on Theology Simply Profound, Rob and Bob wanted to pick up their discussion of the Kingdom of God and the Four-fold Estate of Man with a consideration of Abraham and how God used him in the development of the Kingdom of God in the coming of the Messiah.

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp197/feed/ 0 This week on Theology Simply Profound Rob and Bob wanted to pick up their discussion of the Kingdom of God and the Four fold Estate of Man with a consideration ...OldTestamentReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #62 — The Content of the Prophetic Revelation https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc646/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc646/#respond Fri, 15 May 2020 04:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=26674 We turn to page 234 of Vos’s book, Biblical Theology, to speak about the understanding of monotheism which the biblical prophets possessed. On pages 206–211 of the book, Vos dealt with the modernist conception of the issue, adding a footnote that his positive treatment would be saved for later. Now we arrive at that later portion. As we begin to address this new section, we revisit some of the ground we covered in Vos Group #55, while expanding that material.

On pages 206–211, Vos gives us the key conception of the modernist critics:

The prophets, from Amos and Hosea onwards, are credited with the discovery and establishment of the great truth of ethical monotheism, in which the distinctive and permanent value of Old Testament religion is to be found.

To explain this as crisply as possible, Vos is saying that a particular ethical conception of Jehovah gives rise to the monotheism of the later prophets in the 8th century. It is a monotheism of a particular kind–a monotheism of a specific variety. There is a concrete, historical, situated, ethical dilemma that forges an ethical conception of Jehovah that otherwise would not be formed.

In contrast, Vos emphasizes that the prophets are God-centered. They are religious—meaning they find their delight in spiritual (Spirit-wrought) communion with God. The ethical aspect of monotheism is itself subservient to the glory of God and delight in fellowship with God.

The “prophetic orientation” does not view God as a means to an end, but rather delighting in God himself, as he has revealed himself as sovereign Judge and condescended Lord and Savior of his covenant people. The prophets delight in the God they proclaim and do not re-conceive him as a means to an end other than the glory of God himself as the chief end and delight of his people.

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc646/feed/ 0 59:44We turn to page 234 of Vos s book Biblical Theology to speak about the understanding of monotheism which the biblical prophets possessed On pages 206 211 of the book ...Prophets,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
The Kingdom of God and Noah https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp196/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp196/#respond Tue, 12 May 2020 13:50:45 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=26668 This week on Theology Simply Profound, Rob and Bob wanted to pick up their discussion of the Kingdom of God and the Four-fold Estate of Man with a consideration of Noah and the Flood.

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp196/feed/ 0 51:26This week on Theology Simply Profound Rob and Bob wanted to pick up their discussion of the Kingdom of God and the Four fold Estate of Man with a consideration ...OldTestamentReformed Forumnono
Divine Simplicity and the Old Testament https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc645/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc645/#respond Fri, 08 May 2020 04:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=26575 James Duguid speaks about the doctrine of divine simplicity and its roots in the Old Testament. While the pages of the Old Testament are not typically the first place one would go to build the case for this orthodox doctrine, Duguid demonstrates how the uniqueness of the biblical account establishes a foundation for understanding the Lord who reveals himself through it.

Duguid is the author of “Divine Simplicity, the Ancient Near East, and the Old Testament” in The Lord Is One: Reclaiming Divine Simplicity edited by Joseph Minisch and Onsi A. Kamel and published by The Davenant Press.

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc645/feed/ 0 James Duguid speaks about the doctrine of divine simplicity and its roots in the Old Testament While the pages of the Old Testament are not typically the first place one ...OldTestament,Theology(Proper)Reformed Forumnono
Catholic Theology and the Novels of Graham Greene https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc644/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc644/#respond Fri, 01 May 2020 04:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=26492 Danny Olinger speaks about the theology of Graham Greene, regarded by many as one of the leading English novelists of the twentieth century. Combining literary acclaim with widespread popularity, Greene acquired a reputation early in his lifetime as a major writer of novels so-called “Catholic novels,” as well as political and espionage thrillers. Twice, he was shortlisted for the Nobel Prize for Literature. In his works, Greene explored the ambivalent moral and political issues of the modern world, often through a Catholic perspective.

Rev. Olinger is General Secretary for the Committee on Christian Education of the Orthodox Presbyterian Church. He is the author of Geerhardus Vos: Reformed Biblical Theology, Confessional Presbyterian.

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc644/feed/ 0 Danny Olinger speaks about the theology of Graham Greene regarded by many as one of the leading English novelists of the twentieth century Combining literary acclaim with widespread popularity Greene ...SystematicTheologyReformed Forumnono
Exodus 2:11–15 — The Formation of a Savior https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/pc84/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/pc84/#respond Wed, 29 Apr 2020 04:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=26075 Joel Fick shows us how important it is to bring various passages of Scripture to bear upon one another, particularly where one may fill in the gap for the other. In Exodus 2 we learn how Christ is not a picture of Moses, but rather Moses is a picture of Christ.

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/pc84/feed/ 0 Joel Fick shows us how important it is to bring various passages of Scripture to bear upon one another particularly where one may fill in the gap for the other ...BiblicalTheology,MinistryoftheWord,Pentateuch,PreachingReformed Forumnono
The Kingdom of God and Enoch https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp195/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp195/#respond Tue, 28 Apr 2020 12:35:58 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=26585 This week on Theology Simply Profound, Rob and Bob wanted to pick up their discussion of the Kingdom of God and the Four-fold Estate of Man with a consideration of the preaching ministry of Enoch and how that ministry relates to the the kingdom of God. However, we were sidetracked more than once to talk about the current COVID-19 pandemic, our response to it…yeah, lot’s of rabbit trails.

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp195/feed/ 0 This week on Theology Simply Profound Rob and Bob wanted to pick up their discussion of the Kingdom of God and the Four fold Estate of Man with a consideration ...KingdomofGodReformed Forumnono
The Distance between God and the Creature https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc643/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc643/#respond Fri, 24 Apr 2020 04:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=26480 After having created Adam in his image and placing him in the Garden of Eden, God entered into a covenant with him (Gen. 2:16–17). In Westminster Confession of Faith 7.1, the divines wrote,

The distance between God and the creature is so great, that although reasonable creatures do owe obedience unto him as their Creator, yet they could never have any fruition of him as their blessedness and reward, but by some voluntary condescension on God’s part, which he hath been pleased to express by way of covenant.

There are several important things to note in this passage. First, upon creation and prior to the establishment of the covenant, Adam already knew God and owed him obedience merely from the fact that he was created in God’s image. God did not owe Adam anything, and Adam could in no way place God into his debt. Second, the type of fruition that the covenant affords is that of God as “blessedness and reward.” Adam already owed God personal, perfect, exact and entire obedience, though God voluntarily condescended to establish the covenant of works by which Adam could consummately come to know God in glory. In other words, he could ascend God’s holy hill (Psalm 24) through the gratuitous means God provided.

Westminster Confession of Faith 7.1 is not describing covenant as the means by which God ontologically or metaphysically condescends to creation. God does not assume new properties, attributes, or characteristics to do so. Neither does the confession speak of the covenant as the means by which Adam comes to know God generally—as if Adam would not even know that God existed apart from a covenant. The covenant is the means by which he may come to know God specifically as his blessedness and reward.

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc643/feed/ 0 After having created Adam in his image and placing him in the Garden of Eden God entered into a covenant with him Gen 2 16 17 In Westminster Confession of ...SystematicTheology,WestminsterAssemblyReformed Forumnono
Genesis 26 — Compromise, Controversy, and Covenant https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/pc83/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/pc83/#respond Wed, 22 Apr 2020 04:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=26044 Mark Winder shows us how in the story of Isaac which parallels that of Abraham, there is a theological point being made: from a human perspective there is one crisis after another. But from the divine perspective, there is no salvation outside of God. Only his hand will triumph. We will also see how Abraham’s obedience is a type of the obedience of Christ.

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/pc83/feed/ 0 Mark Winder shows us how in the story of Isaac which parallels that of Abraham there is a theological point being made from a human perspective there is one crisis ...DeuteronomicHistory,MinistryoftheWord,PreachingReformed Forumnono
Justin Martyr on the Eucharist and Lord’s Day Worship https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc642/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc642/#respond Fri, 17 Apr 2020 04:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=26290 In this episode, we continue our discussion of Justin Martyr’s account of ancient Christian worship, focusing this time on the Lord’s Supper (eucharist) and Lord’s Day worship.

Justin Martyr wrote an early account of ancient Christian worship. It was written by a believer for an unbeliever. He does not assume that his intended reader—the Emperor Antoninus Pius (138–161)—knows anything about Christian worship. Second, while Pliny describes the worship practices of the Christians in Pontus, Justin describes the liturgical customs of the church in Rome. Justin lived and worshiped in Rome, but he didn’t convert in Rome. He most likely converted to Christianity in Ephesus around 130 A.D. So he was familiar with the liturgical customs of both Western and Eastern Christians. Third, Justin’s account is descriptive not prescriptive. It’s not a church order (e.g. Didache, Apostolic Tradition). It is simply a description of what Christians were already doing not what Justin thought they ought to do.

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc642/feed/ 0 In this episode we continue our discussion of Justin Martyr s account of ancient Christian worship focusing this time on the Lord s Supper eucharist and Lord s Day worship ...Lord'sSupper,TheLord'sDayReformed Forumnono
Exodus 6:4–11 — The Covenant Keeper https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/pc82/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/pc82/#respond Wed, 15 Apr 2020 04:00:36 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=26042 Jim Cassidy gives us a primer on covenant theology. As Israel, shaped by the law, becomes an analogy of Adam as Adam is in covenant with God in the garden, a pattern is seen between Adam and Israel. If Adam disobeys, he is exiled from the Garden, as is also the case with Israel. God, however, is the covenant keeper, providing redemption for his people in doing what they are unable to do.

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/pc82/feed/ 0 Jim Cassidy gives us a primer on covenant theology As Israel shaped by the law becomes an analogy of Adam as Adam is in covenant with God in the garden ...MinistryoftheWord,Pentateuch,Preaching,ProphetsReformed Forumnono
The Kingdom of God and Creation https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp194/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp194/#respond Tue, 14 Apr 2020 15:46:33 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?post_type=podcast&p=26221 This week on Theology Simply Profound, Rob and Bob pick up their discussion of the Kingdom of God and the Four-fold Estate of Man with a consideration of the kingdom, man, and creation.

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp194/feed/ 0 This week on Theology Simply Profound Rob and Bob pick up their discussion of the Kingdom of God and the Four fold Estate of Man with a consideration of the ...KingdomofGodReformed Forumnono
Justin Martyr and Worship in the Ancient Church https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc641/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc641/#respond Fri, 10 Apr 2020 04:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=26133 In his first apology (ca. 150–155 A.D.), Justin Martyr wrote an early account of ancient Christian worship, describing ancient practices regarding the sacraments and Lord’s Day worship. It was written to an unbeliever, and therefore Justin does not assume that his intended reader—the Emperor Antoninus Pius (138–161)—knows anything about Christian worship. Moreover, while Pliny describes the worship practices of the Christians in Pontus, Justin describes the liturgical customs of the church in Rome. Justin lived and worshiped in Rome, but he didn’t convert in Rome. He most likely converted to Christianity in Ephesus around 130 A.D. So he was familiar with the liturgical customs of both Western and Eastern Christians. It is also important to understand that Justin’s account is descriptive not prescriptive. It is not a church order (e.g. Didache, Apostolic Tradition). It is simply a description of what Christians were already doing not what Justin thought they ought to do.

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc641/feed/ 0 In his first apology ca 150 155 A D Justin Martyr wrote an early account of ancient Christian worship describing ancient practices regarding the sacraments and Lord s Day worship ...Baptism,JustinMartyr,Lord'sSupperReformed Forumnono
Heavenly-Mindedness https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp193/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp193/#respond Tue, 07 Apr 2020 20:35:35 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=26081 This week on Theology Simply Profound, Bob finishes reading from the 1922 edition of Grace and Glory, a collection of sermons delivered at Princeton Theological Seminary by Geerhardus Vos. The sixth of these sermons is on Hebrews 11:9-10, “Heavenly-Mindedness.”

[podcast src=”https://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/13892627/height/90/theme/custom/thumbnail/yes/direction/forward/render-playlist/no/custom-color/990000/” width=”100%” height=”90″ scrolling=”no” class=”podcast-class” frameborder=”0″ placement=”top” use_download_link=”” download_link_text=”” primary_content_url=”http://traffic.libsyn.com/reformedforum/tsp193.mp3″ theme=”custom” custom_color=”990000″ libsyn_item_id=”13892627″ /]

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp193/feed/ 0 This week on Theology Simply Profound Bob finishes reading from the 1922 edition of Grace and Glory a collection of sermons delivered at Princeton Theological Seminary by Geerhardus Vos The ...GeerhardusVos,NewTestamentReformed Forumnono
Pliny the Younger and Worship in the Ancient Church https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc640/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc640/#respond Fri, 03 Apr 2020 04:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=23959 What was worship like in the early church? Did it differ significantly from our present practices? A letter written by a Roman official in 112 AD provides a window into these ancient Christian liturgical practices.

Pliny the Younger was appointed governor of Bithynia in 111 AD by the Emperor Trajan (98–117). Trajan knew that there was social unrest in that province, with a growing number of political factions causing divisions within the city. Among other things, he tasked Pliny with dissolving all associations or clubs in service of keeping the peace. This led him into a quandary regarding the Christians.

In one of the cities, trouble of some kind had arisen regarding the Christians, who were in several cases brought into court and accused of atheism, sexual immorality, incest, and even cannibalism. Pliny the Younger’s letter offers a window into the liturgical practices of ancient Christians and how they were often misunderstood by the world.

Suggested Reading

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc640/feed/ 0 What was worship like in the early church Did it differ significantly from our present practices A letter written by a Roman official in 112 AD provides a window into ...AncientChurch,WorshipReformed Forumnono
The More Excellent Way https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp192/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp192/#respond Tue, 31 Mar 2020 16:13:46 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=26036 This week on Theology Simply Profound, Bob continues reading from the 1922 edition of Grace and Glory, a collection of sermons delivered at Princeton Theological Seminary by Geerhardus Vos. The fifth of these sermons is on 2 Corinthians 3:18, “The More Excellent Way.”

[podcast src=”https://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/13781495/height/90/theme/custom/thumbnail/yes/direction/forward/render-playlist/no/custom-color/990000/” width=”100%” height=”90″ scrolling=”no” class=”podcast-class” frameborder=”0″ placement=”top” use_download_link=”” download_link_text=”” primary_content_url=”http://traffic.libsyn.com/reformedforum/tsp192.mp3″ theme=”custom” custom_color=”990000″ libsyn_item_id=”13781495″ /]

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp192/feed/ 0 This week on Theology Simply Profound Bob continues reading from the 1922 edition of Grace and Glory a collection of sermons delivered at Princeton Theological Seminary by Geerhardus Vos The ...GeerhardusVos,NewTestamentReformed Forumnono
Warfield’s Doctrine of Inspiration https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc639/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc639/#respond Fri, 27 Mar 2020 04:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=25906 In 1894, B. B. Warfield published an article in which he compared the views of the Westminster divines and the Reformers on the mode of inspiration. According to Warfield, the Reformers argued for a mode of concursus while the Protestant Scholastics argued for dictation. Dr. Jeff Stivason analyzes this characterization, speaking to Warfield’s historical context and his understanding of progressive orthodoxy.

Jeff Stivason is pastor of Grace Reformed Presbyterian Church (RPCNA) in Gibsonia, Pennsylvania and professor-elect at Reformed Presbyterian Theological Seminary in Pittsburgh. His article, “Is Warfield’s Claim True that Calvin is Better than Westminster on Inspiration?” is available in the Westminster Theological Journal Vol. 81, No. 2 (Fall 2019), pp. 279–293.

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc639/feed/ 0 In 1894 B B Warfield published an article in which he compared the views of the Westminster divines and the Reformers on the mode of inspiration According to Warfield the ...B.B.Warfield,ScriptureandProlegomenaReformed Forumnono
Seeking and Saving the Lost https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp191/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp191/#respond Tue, 24 Mar 2020 22:42:30 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=26023 This week on Theology Simply Profound, Bob continues reading from the 1922 edition of Grace and Glory, a collection of sermons delivered at Princeton Theological Seminary by Geerhardus Vos. The third of these sermons is on Luke 19:10, “Seeking and Saving the Lost.”

[podcast src=”https://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/13687214/height/90/theme/custom/thumbnail/yes/direction/forward/render-playlist/no/custom-color/990000/” width=”100%” height=”90″ scrolling=”no” class=”podcast-class” frameborder=”0″ placement=”top” use_download_link=”” download_link_text=”” primary_content_url=”http://traffic.libsyn.com/reformedforum/tsp191.mp3″ theme=”custom” custom_color=”990000″ libsyn_item_id=”13687214″ /]

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp191/feed/ 0 This week on Theology Simply Profound Bob continues reading from the 1922 edition of Grace and Glory a collection of sermons delivered at Princeton Theological Seminary by Geerhardus Vos The ...GeerhardusVos,NewTestamentReformed Forumnono
Worship and Ecclesiology While Stuck at Home https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/rfs37/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/rfs37/#respond Mon, 23 Mar 2020 20:01:15 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=26019 In this special quarantine episode, we discuss the theological issues and lessons learned from the initial weeks of staying at home during the global COVID-19 health crisis. Though many Christians are prevented from gathering physically to worship on the Lord’s Day, the Lord has promised that his church shall never perish. While our worship practices may be irregular for a time, God has provided means by which he cares for his people.

[podcast src=”https://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/13667828/height/90/theme/custom/thumbnail/yes/direction/forward/render-playlist/no/custom-color/990000/” width=”100%” height=”90″ scrolling=”no” class=”podcast-class” frameborder=”0″ placement=”bottom” use_download_link=”” download_link_text=”” primary_content_url=”http://traffic.libsyn.com/reformedforum/rfs037.mp3″ theme=”custom” custom_color=”990000″ libsyn_item_id=”13667828″ /]

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/rfs37/feed/ 0 In this special quarantine episode we discuss the theological issues and lessons learned from the initial weeks of staying at home during the global COVID 19 health crisis Though many ...Ecclesiology,WorshipReformed Forumnono
All That Is in God https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc638/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc638/#respond Fri, 20 Mar 2020 04:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=25966

James Dolezal discusses his book All That Is in God: Evangelical Theology and the Challenge of Classical Christian Theism (Reformation Heritage Books, 2017). Dr. Dolezal serves as associate professor in the school of divinity at Cairn University in Langhorne, Pennsylvania.

In this conversation, and the book that guides it, Dolezal addresses the doctrines of classical theism as well as contemporary models of theology proper, which reject, compromise, or otherwise diminish the classical formulations. Interacting with primary sources from theologians such as Bruce Ware, John Frame, and K. Scott Oliphint, Dolezal charitably offers a critique while reaffirming that all that is in God is God.

Links

[podcast src=”https://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/13582649/height/90/theme/custom/thumbnail/yes/direction/forward/render-playlist/no/custom-color/990000/” width=”100%” height=”90″ scrolling=”no” class=”podcast-class” frameborder=”0″ placement=”bottom” use_download_link=”” download_link_text=”” primary_content_url=”http://traffic.libsyn.com/reformedforum/ctc638.mp3″ theme=”custom” custom_color=”990000″ libsyn_item_id=”13582649″ /]

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc638/feed/ 0 James Dolezal discusses his book All That Is in God Evangelical Theology and the Challenge of Classical Christian Theism Reformation Heritage Books 2017 Dr Dolezal serves as associate professor in ...Theology(Proper)Reformed Forumnono
The Kingdom of God and the Fall https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp190/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp190/#respond Tue, 17 Mar 2020 15:50:58 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=25993 This week on Theology Simply Profound, Rob and Bob continue discussing the kingdom of God as it unfolds through the four-fold estate of man: the estate of innocence, fall, redemption, and glory. This week, the Fall.

[podcast src=”https://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/13583207/height/90/theme/custom/thumbnail/yes/direction/forward/render-playlist/no/custom-color/990000/” width=”100%” height=”90″ scrolling=”no” class=”podcast-class” frameborder=”0″ placement=”top” use_download_link=”” download_link_text=”” primary_content_url=”http://traffic.libsyn.com/reformedforum/tsp190.mp3″ theme=”custom” custom_color=”990000″ libsyn_item_id=”13583207″ /]

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp190/feed/ 0 This week on Theology Simply Profound Rob and Bob continue discussing the kingdom of God as it unfolds through the four fold estate of man the estate of innocence fall ...KingdomofGod,OldTestamentReformed Forumnono
Echoes of Exodus https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc637/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc637/#respond Fri, 13 Mar 2020 04:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=25833 Dr. Bryan Estelle joins us to speak about Echoes of Exodus: Tracing a Biblical Motif (IVP Academic, 2018). Israel’s exodus from Egypt is the Bible’s enduring emblem of deliverance. It is the archetypal anvil on which the scriptural language of deliverance is shaped. More than just an epic moment, the exodus shapes the telling of Israel’s and the church’s gospel. Estelle traces the motif as it unfolds throughout Scripture.

Dr. Estelle is professor of Old Testament at Westminster Seminary California in Escondido, California. He is also the author of Salvation through Judgment and Mercy: The Gospel According to Jonah. He has contributed essays to Covenant, Justification, and Pastoral Ministry: Essays by the Faculty of Westminster Seminary California and The Law Is Not of Faith: Essays on Works and Grace in the Mosaic Covenant.

[podcast src=”https://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/13096802/height/90/theme/custom/thumbnail/yes/direction/forward/render-playlist/no/custom-color/990000/” width=”100%” height=”90″ scrolling=”no” class=”podcast-class” frameborder=”0″ placement=”bottom” use_download_link=”” download_link_text=”” primary_content_url=”http://traffic.libsyn.com/reformedforum/ctc637.mp3″ theme=”custom” custom_color=”990000″ libsyn_item_id=”13096802″ /]

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc637/feed/ 0 Dr Bryan Estelle joins us to speak about Echoes of Exodus Tracing a Biblical Motif IVP Academic 2018 Israel s exodus from Egypt is the Bible s enduring emblem of ...NewTestament,OldTestamentReformed Forumnono
Dort’s Study Bible: Colossians 2:8 and Philosophy https://reformedforum.org/dorts-study-bible-colossians-28-and-philosophy/ Wed, 11 Mar 2020 20:07:10 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=25945 The Synod of Dort (1618–19) not only produced the famous Canons of Dort and a church order, but also the first translation of the Bible into Dutch from the original languages, known as the Statenvertaling. Along with this translation, marginal notes (kanttekeningen) were added to aid in the study of God’s Word. You could say it was one of the earliest “Study Bibles,” though the Genevan (1560) has historical priority.

Why are these notes significant? First, while no office bearer in the church was required to subscribe to these marginal notes, like as to the Three Forms of Unity, they still provide a window into the biblical interpretation of the architects of the Canons of Dort.

Second, these notes soon gained international recognition in keeping with the international nature of the synod. In 1645 the Westminster Assembly commissioned Theodore Hank to translate them into English, which he later published in 1657. An English translation of the annotations can be found here.[1] The notes on Colossians 2:8 briefly distinguish between a true and false philosophy and posit the proper use of philosophy as an instrument to better understand or explain God’s Word.

Kolossensen 2:8

Colossians 2:8 reads,

Ziet toe, dat niemand u als een roof vervoere door de filosofie, en ijdele verleiding, naar de overlevering der mensen, naar de eerste beginselen der wereld, en niet naar Christus

Beware lest any man carry you off as spoil through philosophy and vain deceit, after the tradition of men, after the first principles of the world, and not after Christ.

Marginal Note on Ziet toe (“See to it”)

Hier begint de apostel het verhaal der dwalingen, waar hij hen tegen waarschuwt, namelijk wijsbegeerte, menselijke inzettingen, en vermengingen van de wet der ceremoniën, die hij de een voor, de andere na, wederspreekt.

Here the apostle begins the account of the errors against which he warns them, namely, philosophy, human ordinances and mingling of the ceremonial law, which he, the one first, the other after, opposes.

Marginal Note on als een roof (“as spoil”)

… namelijk van Christus en Zijne waarheid tot andere leringen of middelen ter zaligheid buiten Christus; ene gelijkenis, genomen van rovers, die niet alleen de goederen, maar ook de mensen zelf tot een roof wegvoerden, om hen tot slaven … te maken. Zie een voorbeeld, 1 Sam. 30.

… namely, from Christ and His truth unto other doctrines or means of salvation outside of Christ. A similitude taken from such robbers, who used to carry away not only goods, but also the persons themselves for a prey, to make them slaves …. See an example, 1 Samuel 30.

Marginal note on de filosofie (“philosophy”)

Hierdoor wordt de rechte filosofie niet verstaan, die ene gave Gods is, en zelfs een instrument of middel is, dienstig om Gods Woord beter te verstaan en te verklaren; maar de sophisterij of bedriegelijke schijnwijsheid van enige heidense filosofen, gelijk de volgende woorden ijdele verleiding verklaren, en gelijk Paulus hiervan spreekt, Rom. 1:21, 22, welke filosofen in deze hunne schijnwijsheid enige dingen van God en van den weg tot het opperste goed hadden voorgesteld, die deze leraars met het Evangelie wilden vermengen, gelijk ook de scholastieke leraars in het Pausdom doen, waardoor de eenvoudigheid en oprechtheid der zaligmakende leer van het Evangelie merkelijk is verduisterd en vervalst.

Hereby is not understood the true philosophy, which is a gift of God and is even an instrument or means useful for the better understanding and explaining of the Word of God, but the sophistry or specious discourses of some pagan philosophers, as the following words vain deceit declare, and as Paul speaks hereof in Rom. 1:2122, which philosophers in this their apparent wisdom had propounded some things concerning God, and concerning the way to the highest good, which these teachers wanted to mingle with the Gospel, as the scholastic teachers also do amongst the Papists, whereby the simplicity and sincerity of the saving doctrine of the Gospel is notably obscured and falsified.

Revelation and Philosophy according to Groen van Prinsterer

Groen van Prinsterer cites this marginal note in his Proeve over de middelen waardoor de waarheid wordt gekend en gestaafd (1834) in support of his claim: “Revelation alone is the foundation of a complete philosophy; it contains the highest, the only true philosophy.”[2] This statement comes in the context of a larger discussion on Christianity and philosophy:

Man is related to the spiritual and the material world. No human reasoning teaches how spirit and matter are united in him; the philosopher has preferably devoted himself to one or the other component, so that one has either spiritualized the dust or materialized the spirit. Spiritualism and materialism emerged.[3]

For man, if he does not know the first cause of universal corruption, then there is no more enigmatic being than he himself. He feels a pull toward a higher existence; but he also feels that he is at every turn led by inclinations and impulses in the opposite direction.  How great and also how miserable; how earthly, and also how heavenly![4]

Christianity solves the riddles that cannot be solved by philosophy, insofar as this is necessary for wisdom about life [levenswijsheid] and eternal happiness. By faith, the harmony of feeling and reason is restored. Revelation teaches how the self-consciousness of greatness and misery can be explained. She gives firmness to principles while she allows freedom of opinions. She gives what philosophy promised.[5]

Christian philosophy … contains the life principle [levensbeginsel] of knowledge and science. She is the sun, which spreads over the field of human investigation brightness, warmth, and life. Every science, properly practiced, bears witness to the truth of revelation; not properly practiced, they glorify, by deviations and misunderstandings, the highest truth nolens volens. Accurate study leads back to the universal source of light and life.[6]


  1. Thank you to Slabbert Le Cornu for bringing this English translation to my attention. May the Lord bless your efforts in translating these notes into Afrikaans.
  2. De Openbaring alleen is de grondslag eener volledige wijsbegeerte; zij bevat de hoogste, de alleen ware filozofie.
  3. De mensch is aan de geestelijke en aan de stofflijke wereld verwant. Geen menschelijke redenering leert hoe geest en stof vereenigd in hem zijn; de wijsgeer heeft zich bij voorkeur aan het eene of aan het andere bestanddeel gehecht, zoodat men óf het stof vergeestelijkt, óf den geest verstoffelijkt heeft. 
  4. Voor den mensch, zoo hij de eerste oorzaak der algemeene verbastering niet kent, is geen raadselachtiger wezen dan hij zelf. Hij gevoelt een trek naar hooger bestaan; doch gevoelt ook dat hij telkens door neigingen en driften in tegenovergestelden zin wordt geleid. Hoe groot en tevens hoe ellendig; hoe aardsch, en tevens hoe hemelschgezind!
  5. Het Christendom lost de voor de wijsbegeerte onoplosbare raadselen, voor zoo ver dit tot levenswijsheid en eeuwig geluk noodig is, op. Door het geloof wordt de harmonie van gevoel en rede hersteld. De Openbaring leert hoe de zelfbewustheid van grootheid en ellende kan worden verklaard. Zij geeft vastheid van beginsels terwijl ze vrijheid van meeningen laat. Zij geeft wat de wijsbegeerte belooft.
  6. De christelijke wijsbegeerte … bevat het levensbeginsel van kennis en wetenschap. Zij is de zon, die op het veld van menschelijk onderzoek helderheid, warmte en leven verspreidt. Elke wetenschap, wel beoefend, legt van de waarheid der Openbaring getuigenis af; niet wel beoefend, verheerlijkt zij, door afwijking en wanbegrip, de hoogste waarheid tegen wil en dank. Naauwkeurige studie brengt naar de algemeene bron van licht en leven terug. 

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The Synod of Dort 1618 19 not only produced the famous Canons of Dort and a church order but also the first translation of the Bible into Dutch from the ...Philosophy,SynodofDortReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #61: The Mode of Communication of the Prophecy https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc636/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc636/#respond Fri, 06 Mar 2020 05:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=25895 We turn to pages 230–233 of Vos’s book, Biblical Theology, to speak about the mode by which the Lord delivers his message to the prophet. Man is made in the image of God, which means he has a special capacity to commune with God. Vos marvels at the way in which divine speech is transmitted to those made in his image. God’s word is communicated in servant form without evacuating the message of any of its divine characteristics, such as inerrancy or infallibility. The Holy Spirit works in the prophet in such a way as to inspire and superintend the entire activity of the prophet—whether in speech or inscripturation.

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc636/feed/ 0 We turn to pages 230 233 of Vos s book Biblical Theology to speak about the mode by which the Lord delivers his message to the prophet Man is made ...BiblicalTheology,Prophets,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Sun and Moon: Illustrating the Relationship between the Old and New Testaments https://reformedforum.org/sun-and-moon-illustrating-the-relationship-between-the-old-and-new-testaments/ https://reformedforum.org/sun-and-moon-illustrating-the-relationship-between-the-old-and-new-testaments/#respond Sat, 29 Feb 2020 05:01:31 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=25883 If the ease of being illustrated were a touchstone of the truth, then Augustine’s well known adage has been proven ten times over: “The new is in the old concealed; the old is in the new revealed.”

John Calvin (1509–1564) employs the shadow-form (σκια-εικων) imagery of Hebrews 10:1 to speak of the Old Testament Law as a sketch that the New Testament Gospel colors in. He writes, “Under the Law was shadowed forth only in rude and imperfect lines what is under the Gospel set forth in living colors and graphically distinct.”

B. B. Warfield (1851–1921), with particular reference to the revelation of the doctrine of the Trinity, likened the Old Testament to “a chamber richly furnished but dimly lighted.” The New Testament, by introducing more light, “brings into it nothing which was not in it before.” Rather, “it brings out into clearer view much of what is in it, but was only dimly or even not at all perceived before.”

Herman Bavinck (1854–1921) wrote that the relationship between the Old and New Testaments “is like that of pedestal and statue, lock and key, shadow and body.”

Geerhardus Vos (1862–1949) emphasized the organic progression of God’s revelation in Scripture over against evolutionary models by speaking of it as a seed that grows into a tree.

A lesser known illustration may be found in the work of the Dutch-Reformed politician and historian, Guillaume Groen van Prinsterer (1801–1876), entitled, Proeve over de middelen waardoor de waarheid wordt gekend en gestaafd. He quotes the German theologian, Philipp Marheinecke (1780–1846):

Der … dunkle Mond des Alten Testaments hat sein Licht allein von der Gnadensonne des Evangeliums.

The dark moon of the Old Testament has its light only from the sun of grace of the Gospel.

Groen comments,

De Israëliet zag op den Heiland die komen zou; de Christen ziet op den Heiland die gekomen is en wederkomen zal.

The Israelite looked on the Savior who was to come; the Christian looks on the Savior who has come and will come again.

In the words of Christ himself in John 5:39,

You search the Scriptures because you think that in them you have eternal life; and it is they that bear witness about me.

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https://reformedforum.org/sun-and-moon-illustrating-the-relationship-between-the-old-and-new-testaments/feed/ 0 If the ease of being illustrated were a touchstone of the truth then Augustine s well known adage has been proven ten times over The new is in the old ...BiblicalTheologyReformed Forumnono
The Kingdom of God https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc635/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc635/#respond Fri, 28 Feb 2020 05:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=25831 Dr. S. M. Baugh joins us to speak about his book, The Majesty on High: An Introduction to the Kingdom of God in the New Testament. Beginning with a definition of the kingdom of God based on the new creation, Baugh introduces the reader to the kingdom and its foundational issues.

Dr. Baugh is professor of New Testament at Westminster Seminary California in Escondido, California. He is also the author of Ephesians: Evangelical Exegetical Commentary (EEC).

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc635/feed/ 0 Dr S M Baugh joins us to speak about his book The Majesty on High An Introduction to the Kingdom of God in the New Testament Beginning with a definition ...BiblicalTheology,KingdomofGod,NewTestamentReformed Forumnono
Hungering and Thirsting After Righteousness https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp189/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp189/#respond Tue, 25 Feb 2020 06:00:31 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=25871 This week on Theology Simply Profound, Bob continues reading from the 1922 edition of Grace and Glory, a collection of sermons delivered at Princeton Theological Seminary by Geerhardus Vos. The second of these sermons is on Matthew 5:6, “Hungering and Thirsting After Righteousness.”

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp189/feed/ 0 This week on Theology Simply Profound Bob continues reading from the 1922 edition of Grace and Glory a collection of sermons delivered at Princeton Theological Seminary by Geerhardus Vos The ...GeerhardusVos,NewTestamentReformed Forumnono
With All Your Heart https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc634/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc634/#respond Fri, 21 Feb 2020 05:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=25826 Dr. A. Craig Troxel speaks about With All Your Heart: Orienting Your Mind, Desires, and Will toward Christ (Crossway, 2020). Whereas contemporary culture identifies the “heart” with feelings and emotions, Craig Troxel speaks about the range of uses of the word “heart” in the Bible. The heart knows, desires, and chooses. This fuller conception of “heart” helps us understand our battle with sin and the redemption that has been wrought by Jesus Christ.

Dr. Troxel is professor of practical theology at Westminster Seminary California. He previously served as pastor of Bethel Orthodox Presbyterian Church in Wheaton, Illinois and Calvary Presbyterian Church (OPC) in Glenside, Pennsylvania.

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc634/feed/ 0 Dr A Craig Troxel speaks about With All Your Heart Orienting Your Mind Desires and Will toward Christ Crossway 2020 Whereas contemporary culture identifies the heart with feelings and emotions ...Anthropology,ChristianLivingReformed Forumnono
Karl Barth and the “Word-of-Godness” of Scripture https://reformedforum.org/karl-barth-and-the-word-of-godness-of-scripture/ https://reformedforum.org/karl-barth-and-the-word-of-godness-of-scripture/#respond Wed, 19 Feb 2020 10:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=24406 I often receive questions about Barth’s views on the Bible, which admittedly is a challenging topic. According to Karl Barth, the Bible is not revelation. The Bible is one of three modes of Barth’s doctrine of the Word of God. While Barth can say that the Bible is the Word of God, he will not, however, affirm that it is the revelation of God. Only God’s act of grace in Jesus Christ is revelation. Scripture, like the church’s preaching, merely witnesses to the Word of God in revelation. Consequently, the Bible is not inerrant.

Barth is also clear that there is a kind of becoming to the Bible as the Word of God. “The Word-of-Godness” (that’s my expression, not Barth’s) of Scripture is not inherent in Scripture itself. Rather, its “Word-of-Godness” is actualized “from above,” as it were, through God’s act of grace and self-disclosure in Jesus Christ. In other words, the “Word-of-Godness” that Scripture becomes arises not from Scripture itself, but from God.

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https://reformedforum.org/karl-barth-and-the-word-of-godness-of-scripture/feed/ 0 I often receive questions about Barth s views on the Bible which admittedly is a challenging topic According to Karl Barth the Bible is not revelation The Bible is one ...KarlBarth,ScriptureandProlegomenaReformed Forumnono
The Kingdom of God and the Estate of Innocence https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp188/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp188/#respond Tue, 18 Feb 2020 22:44:14 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=25865 This week on Theology Simply Profound, Rob and Bob begin a new series discussing the kingdom of God as it unfolds through the four-fold estate of man: the estate of innocence, fall, redemption, and glory.

[podcast src=”https://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/13205900/height/90/theme/custom/thumbnail/yes/direction/forward/render-playlist/no/custom-color/990000/” width=”100%” height=”90″ scrolling=”no” class=”podcast-class” frameborder=”0″ placement=”top” use_download_link=”” download_link_text=”” primary_content_url=”http://traffic.libsyn.com/reformedforum/tsp188.mp3″ theme=”custom” custom_color=”#990000″ libsyn_item_id=”13205900″ /]

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp188/feed/ 0 This week on Theology Simply Profound Rob and Bob begin a new series discussing the kingdom of God as it unfolds through the four fold estate of man the estate ...BiblicalTheology,KingdomofGod,OldTestamentReformed Forumnono
Van Til and the Creator-Creature Relation https://reformedforum.org/van-til-and-the-creator-creature-relation/ https://reformedforum.org/van-til-and-the-creator-creature-relation/#respond Mon, 17 Feb 2020 21:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=25858 On February 7, 1951, Cornelius Van Til wrote an insightful letter to neo-evangelical theologian Carl F. H. Henry. While it was written sixty-nine years ago, the letter demonstrates Van Til’s awareness of contemporary issues in theology proper while also anticipating those in our present context. His criticism applies to doctrinal formulations arising within the Thomistic and Barthian traditions. Oddly enough, it also applies to formulations of theologians closely identified with his own legacy such as John Frame and K. Scott Oliphint, who qualify divine immutability and impassibility with respect to the Creator-creature relation in order to identify a principle of unity between the two.

The following excerpt is from Cornelius Van Til, letter to Carl F. H. Henry, February 7, 1951, archives of the Montgomery Library, Westminster Theological Seminary.


Modern philosophy, realizing that the staticism of the Greeks led into a blind alley has assumed that all reality is basically temporal (Realitat zeitigt sich). That is Kant’s great contribution. But the contrast between modern and ancient philosophy on this matter is not absolute. All non-Christian philosophy assumes that change or chance is ultimate. Not holding to the Creator-creature distinction all non-Christians are not only monists and staticists but also pluralists and temporalists. Chance has some spot in all non-Christian systems; it is given a larger place in modern than in ancient philosophy.

Accordingly, it is our business as Christians to begin our interpretation of reality upon the presupposition of the Creator-creature distinction as basic to everything else. We must refuse to say one single word about the nature of reality as a whole before we introduce the Creator-creature distinction. If with Aquinas we first start speaking about reality and say that it is analogical then we can never after that come to the Christian doctrine of God as Creator and controller of the world. We should argue that intelligent predication is impossible except one make the Creator-creature distinction basic to one’s thought. The fact that speculation is wholly self-frustrative on any but the Christian basis can be shown easily. On any non-Christian basis a man must either know everything so that he need not ask questions or he knows nothing so that he cannot ask questions (But I need not go into this).

Starting with the Creator-creature distinction as basic to one’s thought one need not and in fact cannot after that discuss such concepts as time and eternity by themselves. By themselves they are abstractions. True we can speak of them by themselves as we can speak of the justice of God by itself. But when we speak of the justice of God by itself we always insist that it is the justice of God, that it is an attribute of God. The justice of God is therefore interwoven with the other attributes of God and with the being of God. So also with eternity. It is the eternity of God. And God is man’s creator. And time is characteristic of the created world.

As then it is fatal to fail to introduce the Creator-creature distinction at the outset of one’s thought so it is also fatal to fail to think of eternity as exclusively a characteristic of God and of time as exclusively a characteristic of the created world. It would be to make God subject to the conditions of his creatures, subject to change, etc.

This is I think the only sound approach to the matter. But admittedly it is only an approach. We cannot ever conceptualize the relation between God’s eternity and man’s temporality for the reason that we cannot conceptualize the relation of God to his creature. The Greeks wanted to conceptualize the relation of god to man and they came to the conclusion that both are eternal. The modern man wants to conceptualize the relation between the two and comes to the conclusion that both are temporal. The Christian position stands squarely over against both by its starting point.

The Greek and the modern views both want to conceptualize the relation between God and man because they want a principle of unity that outreaches both. They think that on a Christian basis one is bound to dualism, authoritarianism, etc. As it turns out it is only on the frankly and most consistently Christian basis that ultimate dualism can be avoided. It cannot be avoided in the sense that man can ever expect to understand exhaustively but it can be avoided by presupposing God, who is not subject to the limits of man, as the positive presupposition of human predication.

It is therefore not so much a matter of detailed exegesis but of the consistent application of basically biblical concepts that is important in setting the Christian position over against both the ancient and the modern forms of paganism. The sad results of a failure to do so can best be seen in the latest works of Barth.


For historical context and biographical information, consult John R. Muether, Cornelius Van Til: Reformed Apologist and Churchman (P&R Publishing, 2008), especially pp. 119–178. For my interaction with the thesis represented in K. Scott Oliphint, God with Us, read this post. For a helpful summary and treatment of what James Dolezal identifies as “theological mutualism,” I suggest reading his book, All That Is in God: Evangelical Theology and the Challenge of Classical Christian Theism (Reformation Heritage Books, 2017). Readers would also benefit from a careful study of several Reformed dogmatics, especially Herman Bavinck, Reformed Dogmatics, 2:95–177 and Geerhardus Vos, Reformed Dogmatics, 2:3–37, 177–182.

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https://reformedforum.org/van-til-and-the-creator-creature-relation/feed/ 0 On February 7 1951 Cornelius Van Til wrote an insightful letter to neo evangelical theologian Carl F H Henry While it was written sixty nine years ago the letter demonstrates ...Attributes,CorneliusVanTilReformed Forumnono
Politics after Christendom https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc633/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc633/#comments Fri, 14 Feb 2020 05:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=25815 David VanDrunen speaks about his forthcoming book, Politics After Christendom (Zondervan Academic), reflecting upon the status and responsibilities of Christians in their contemporary pluralistic political communities. Dr. VanDrunen presents a biblical-theological model of political engagement and exploring themes such as race, religious liberty, justice, authority, and civil resistance.

David VanDrunen is Robert B. Strimple Professor of Systematic Theology and Christian Ethics at Westminster Seminary California. He is the author and editor of several books, including Aquinas Among the Protestants, God’s Glory Alone: The Majestic Heart of Christian Faith and Life, Natural Law and the Two Kingdoms: A Study in the Development of Reformed Social Thought, and Divine Covenants and Moral Order: A Biblical Theology of Natural Law.

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc633/feed/ 1 David VanDrunen speaks about his forthcoming book Politics After Christendom Zondervan Academic reflecting upon the status and responsibilities of Christians in their contemporary pluralistic political communities Dr VanDrunen presents a ...Anthropology,PoliticsReformed Forumnono
Rabboni! https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp187/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp187/#respond Tue, 11 Feb 2020 06:00:18 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=25827 This week on Theology Simply Profound, Bob continues reading from the 1922 edition of Grace and Glory, a collection of sermons delivered at Princeton Theological Seminary by Geerhardus Vos. The fourth of these sermons is on John 20:16, “Rabboni!”

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp187/feed/ 0 This week on Theology Simply Profound Bob continues reading from the 1922 edition of Grace and Glory a collection of sermons delivered at Princeton Theological Seminary by Geerhardus Vos The ...GeerhardusVos,NewTestamentReformed Forumnono
Vos Group Excursus: John 20:1–18 — Rabboni https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc632/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc632/#comments Fri, 07 Feb 2020 05:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=24113 We take a brief break from our regular schedule in Geerhardus Vos’s book, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments, to discuss Vos’s sermon “Rabboni,” on John 20:16. This sermon is found in Grace & Glory, a collection of Vos’s sermons preached at the chapel of Princeton Seminary.

John 20:1–18 (ESV)

Now on the first day of the week Mary Magdalene came to the tomb early, while it was still dark, and saw that the stone had been taken away from the tomb. So she ran and went to Simon Peter and the other disciple, the one whom Jesus loved, and said to them, “They have taken the Lord out of the tomb, and we do not know where they have laid him.” So Peter went out with the other disciple, and they were going toward the tomb. Both of them were running together, but the other disciple outran Peter and reached the tomb first. And stooping to look in, he saw the linen cloths lying there, but he did not go in. Then Simon Peter came, following him, and went into the tomb. He saw the linen cloths lying there, and the face cloth, which had been on Jesus’ head, not lying with the linen cloths but folded up in a place by itself. Then the other disciple, who had reached the tomb first, also went in, and he saw and believed; for as yet they did not understand the Scripture, that he must rise from the dead. 10 Then the disciples went back to their homes. 

11 But Mary stood weeping outside the tomb, and as she wept she stooped to look into the tomb. 12 And she saw two angels in white, sitting where the body of Jesus had lain, one at the head and one at the feet. 13 They said to her, “Woman, why are you weeping?” She said to them, “They have taken away my Lord, and I do not know where they have laid him.” 14 Having said this, she turned around and saw Jesus standing, but she did not know that it was Jesus. 15 Jesus said to her, “Woman, why are you weeping? Whom are you seeking?” Supposing him to be the gardener, she said to him, “Sir, if you have carried him away, tell me where you have laid him, and I will take him away.” 16 Jesus said to her, “Mary.” She turned and said to him in Aramaic, “Rabboni!” (which means Teacher). 17 Jesus said to her, “Do not cling to me, for I have not yet ascended to the Father; but go to my brothers and say to them, ‘I am ascending to my Father and your Father, to my God and your God.’ ” 18 Mary Magdalene went and announced to the disciples, “I have seen the Lord”—and that he had said these things to her. 

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc632/feed/ 1 We take a brief break from our regular schedule in Geerhardus Vos s book Biblical Theology Old and New Testaments to discuss Vos s sermon Rabboni on John 20 16 ...BiblicalTheology,GeerhardusVos,Gospels,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Simply Blessed: Mastricht, Minimalism and the Messiah https://reformedforum.org/simply-blessed-mastricht-minimalism-and-the-messiah/ https://reformedforum.org/simply-blessed-mastricht-minimalism-and-the-messiah/#comments Tue, 04 Feb 2020 15:32:02 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=25641

Epicurus sought blessedness either in external and carnal delights, or in inner tranquility of soul, or in both at once; Muhammad sought it in all sorts of external delights; and neither of the two sought it in the possession, communion, enjoyment, and glorification of God. By that fact neither acknowledges that God is sufficient to make him blessed, nor consequently that God himself is blessed.

Petrus van Mastricht, Theoretical-Practical Theology, 2:491

The Modern Messiah: Minimalism

Consumerism “is perhaps the most powerful religious movement at work in the West today.”[1] Coursing through its veins is the lifeblood of globalization and postmodernity. The production of unprecedented wealth in the West has been wedded to a rejection of an overarching story or worldview that gives meaning to our lives. Consumerism is their offspring. It has been borne to the high places from where it reigns supreme, decreeing a culture of consumption—nothing is off-limits, everything is desirable, all are on the hunt for more.

But the never-ending hunt of consumerism has, for tired souls, given way to the simple house-cleaning of minimalism that prioritizes control and seeks inner tranquility.

YouTube (verb) “minimalism” and begin scrolling. But be warned: it doesn’t end. It’s a dismal descent, deeper and deeper into that virtual black hole—you will not escape its gravitational pull until it’s 3 a.m. and, like Nebuchadnezzar driven from among men, your reason finally returns to you. Ironic, though, how minimalist sages have maximized on YouTube’s algorithm, and the very same secular prophets who decry consumerism for its financial obsession have come away with a nice profit of their own. 

Netflix even features a film, “Minimalism: A Documentary About the Important Things.” The trailer opens with these words: “We spend so much time on the hunt, but nothing ever quite does it for us. And we get so wrapped up in the hunt that it kind of makes us miserable.” Barbaric Black Friday footage ensues—consumerism unhinged—climaxing with insight that nails consumerism’s coffin shut, “You’re not going to get happier by consuming more.” How should we then live? Cue the messiah who will save us from our consumerism: minimalism.

Note, it’s not consumerism in principle that minimalism combats, but consumerism in its failed state: it promised happiness, but never delivered. “It makes us miserable” and “You’re not going to get happier” bookend the perceived plight of consumerism. Minimalism, therefore, is heralded, proclaimed, even preached as the messiah who will make good on consumerism’s unfulfilled promise to make us happy. The titles of these videos with hundreds of thousands of views tell the story: “5 Ways Minimalism Improves Our Happiness,” “A Minimalist Lifestyle Will Make You Happier,” “Why More Stuff Won’t Make You Happy,” and “Less stuff, more happiness.”

Blaise Pascal is again vindicated when he wrote,

All men seek happiness. This is without exception. Whatever different means they employ, they all tend to this end. The cause of some going to war, and of others avoiding it, is the same desire in both, attended with different views. The will never takes the least step but to this object. This is the motive of every action of every man, even of those who hang themselves.

So too the Dutch-Reformed theologian, Petrus van Mastricht:

[T]here is no one who does not desire his own blessedness. … [N]othing is desirable apart from blessedness; indeed, nothing is desirable except for the sake of blessedness. For why do people desire wealth, honors, pleasures, and so forth, except for the sake of blessedness? And likewise, why do we turn from and avoid every adversity, except that they impede and disturb our blessedness?

Theoretical-Practical Theology, 2:493-94

The pendulum has swung from external delight to internal tranquility, from consumerism to minimalism in hopes of finding peace and contentment, blessedness and happiness, satisfaction and fulfillment. The hunt has been exchanged for the hammock. 

But is minimalism our liberator or the same captor in a new guise?

Before scorching minimalism by placing it before the true Savior whose eyes are like a flame of fire (Rev. 1:14), there is much to commend about it—not, of course, as a modern messiah who can secure our blessedness, but as encapsulating some biblical wisdom according to God’s common grace.

Commandeering Minimalism

In what ways can we commandeer minimalism as Christians to aid us in our service to King Jesus and pursuit of God’s glory in all things? Here are a minimum of six ways.

1. An Apologetic against Consumerism, Confirming Job and Ecclesiastes. Minimalism exposes the futility, emptiness, and deception of consumerism. Consuming more of what already doesn’t make you happy will not make you happy—just ask Solomon in Ecclesiastes. “Vanity of vanities! All is vanity.” But if consumerism face-plants against the wisdom of Ecclesiastes, then minimalism does the same with the wisdom of Job. The point of Ecclesiastes and Job is the same from opposite ends: God alone is my blessedness whether I have everything or I have nothing—in him I rest satisfied (Ps. 16:11; 73:25).

2. Imitates God’s Simplicity. Minimalism even imitates—on a finite, creaturely level—the simplicity of God. The following quote may prove Mastricht (1630-1706) a minimalist long before it became trendy:

The divine simplicity teaches us to acquiesce to our lot, however simple it may be. For the more simple anything is, the more constant it is, and durable, whereas the more composite, likewise the more dissoluble and corruptible. Thus, God is most immutable because he is most simple…. When it comes to our lot, the exact same is true: the more simple, the more solid, and the more variegated from compositions by wealth, honors, friends, the more mutable, and the more you are distracted by so many objects, the more you are liable to cares and anxieties (Luke 10:41), for the more you possess, the more you can lose. It is thus on this account that we should, in godly self-sufficiency, accustom our soul to simplicity, and should substitute, for the variety of things, the one God who is most sufficient in every way for all things (Gen. 17:1), who is accordingly for us the one thing necessary (Luke 10:42). So then let us possess him as our lot, with a simple acquiescence, and other things as corollaries (Matt. 6:33), looking to the apostle, who urges this contentment (1 Tim. 6:6) and lights our way in it with his own example (Phil. 4:11-12).

Theoretical-Practical Theology, 2:152

3. Glorifies God’s All-Sufficiency for Himself and Us. Not filling our lives with distractions upon distractions, even being willing to forgo good things and comforts for the sake of the gospel and Christian love, magnifies God as our sufficiency. Pascal observed that we fill our lives with diversions and distractions to console ourselves from our miseries, and yet this is the greatest of our miseries. “I have often said that the sole cause of man’s unhappiness is that he does not know how to stay quietly in his room.” But the person who has been reconciled to God in Christ draws near to the throne of grace with their once-guilty conscience now cleansed by the once-for-all shed blood of Christ. His blood has also obtained for us the right to eat from the heavenly altar and so have our hearts strengthened by grace. “For here we have no lasting city, but we seek the city that is to come” (Heb. 13:14).

4. Fits a Pilgrim Lifestyle. The letter to the Hebrews situates the church in the wilderness between redemption and consummation. The wilderness is marked by want and lack, barrenness and emptiness—a perfect place for God to test the faith of his people. But while the wilderness makes us acutely aware of what we do not have, the author of Hebrews reminds us of what we do have. Note the verb “to have” (ἔχω) bookends the rich theological core of the letter that expounds the heavenly high priesthood of Jesus Christ (4:14–10:25). That we have Jesus Christ as our high priest is the indicative (statement of fact) from which the imperatives (statement of command) arise. “We have … therefore, let us…” is the basic gospel pattern of the letter.[2] As we reckon with our present redemptive-historical situation as pilgrims in the wilderness who are seeking a city that is to come, even as strangers and exiles on earth who are seeking a homeland and desiring a better country, that is, a heavenly one, we draw strength from knowing that we already possess Jesus Christ as our high priest who bears our names on his heart in heaven before the Father, unashamed to call us his brothers. Though I may not have many comforts or much security and my possessions and freedom may even be taken from me (Heb. 10:32ff.), I have him, and because I have him, I can persevere and will one day arrive on the shores of that longed-for heavenly country where he is. If minimalism may be understood as foregoing earthly pleasures for heavenly rewards, a kind of transcending of the temporal sphere, then Moses would be a minimalist: “By faith Moses, when he was grown up, refused to be called the son of Pharaoh’s daughter, choosing rather to be mistreated with the people of God than to enjoy the fleeting pleasures of sin” (11:24-25). This kind of minimalism fits our identity as a pilgrim people. 

5. Promotes Prayer. Luke reminds us that Jesus frequently withdrew to the wilderness to pray (5:16) and Mark tells us that Jesus rose early in the morning, while it was still dark, left the house and went off to a solitary place to pray (1:35). While there is much more to this, we can at least see that removing distractions and quieting ourselves before God promotes and prioritizes prayer in our lives—something all-too elusive in our distracted age.

6. Boosts Productivity, Improves Organization and Reduces Stress. Practically, minimalism will make you more productive, which is good and desirable as a means to honor God in the stewardship of your time. As a matter of fact, a clean, organized desk that is used not as an additional bookshelf but as a workstation will probably speed up your sermon prep, keep your mind focused on the task at-hand so you can think more deeply about it, and make your study overall more efficient. Check out Matt Perman’s How to Set Up Your Desk: A Guide to Fixing a (Surprisingly) Overlooked Productivity Problem.

Unmasking Minimalism

So minimalism has its benefits, but as a messiah who will make us blessed, it must be wholeheartedly cast into the fire. Minimalism is the same captor as consumerism, but in a different guise. Both enslave us to ourselves. Both make self-realization the path of happiness. Both seek fulfillment in the creation apart from the Creator. Neither can deal with the source of our misery: our sin that has alienated us from the God who is forever blessed and the source of all blessedness. External delights or internal tranquility is proclaimed as that which will make you happy and blessed, but neither can make you right with God who created you for himself. 

Furthermore, minimalism cannot be absolute since it can only thrive in the wake of the exhaustion of consumerism. Minimalism presents itself as our savior from consumerism. The hammock allures the man exhausted from the hunt. Minimalism realizes the misery that possessing and pursuing more things brings, but instead of turning to the one thing that can satisfy and give you rest, God himself, it turns to an abstract principle of renunciation. It addresses the symptoms, but not the disease; in fact, it has no intention of ever healing you. 

The True Messiah: Mastricht contra Minimalism

Neither consumerism nor minimalism can make us happy. When either is raised to messianic proportions, their disciples are left dry and doomed. But there is a tertium quid (a third option) that only the Christian can see. Mastricht is again our guide:

Epicurus sought blessedness either in external and carnal delights, or in inner tranquility of soul, or in both at once; Muhammad sought it in all sorts of external delights; and neither of the two sought it in the possession, communion, enjoyment, and glorification of God. By that fact neither acknowledges that God is sufficient to make him blessed, nor consequently that God himself is blessed.

Theoretical-Practical Theology, 2:491

There is nothing new under the sun. Minimalism is as ancient a lifestyle as any, and God himself always remains the answer. Consumerists and minimalists will always be restless until they rest in God. Blessedness, happiness, satisfaction, fullness are to the world as mythical as Atlantis or the Holy Grail or the fountain of youth, for they are not found on earth, but with God. Although the distance between God and us is infinite, we can enjoy him as our blessedness and reward because he has voluntarily condescended to us by way of covenant (WCF 7.1). “I will be your God and you will be my people” is the joyful chorus of Scripture.

“Blessed are the people whose God is the LORD!”

Psalm 144:15

Furthermore, as Mastricht observes, “[The blessedness of God] convinces us that the blessedness of the rational creature is possible, because not only is God most blessed, and thus able to communicate his blessedness, but he has also endued rational creatures with an appetite for blessedness, and certainly he did not do so in vain (Ps. 4:6)” (Theoretical-Practical Theology, 2:493). Whether we possess everything according to the wisdom of consumerism or nothing according to the wisdom of minimalism, we will always feel our extreme misery as long as we are destitute of God and are the enemies of him who is the source of all joy (Isa. 59:2; Eph. 2:12). 

Where, then, can I find true happiness? Mastricht steers us in the right direction: 

(a) in union or possession of the most blessed one (Ps. 73:25; 16:5; 33:12; 144:15);

(b) in communion with God (1 John 1:3; 2 Cor. 13:14), by which he is with us, in us, for us, and, as our God, devotes himself and all his attributes to us and to our blessing (Rom. 8:32);

(c) in the enjoyment of God, which embraces, first, the perfect knowledge (and as it were the vision) of God (John 17:3; 1 Cor. 13:12; Job 19:26-27), and of our blessedness as well, in union and communion with God (2 Cor. 3:18; 4:6), and second, a perfect repose and joy arising from this union and communion, together with our knowledge of it, that is, a perfect fulness of joys and pleasures with God’s face, and at his right hand (Ps. 16:11; 1 Cor. 2:9; Ps. 84:11);

(d) in the sweetest glorification of God (Isa. 6:3; Rev. 4:8, 10-11; 5:9ff.). 

Theoretical-Practical Theology, 2:493

If that is where true happiness is found, then how do I make it my own? Mastricht opens up God’s Word and exhorts us to… 

Pursue reconciliation with God with all our effort, through faith in the blood of the Mediator (2 Cor. 5:19-20; Col. 1:20), that we may be freed from all evil, which is the first part of blessedness.

Strive for union with Christ, that at the same time we may be united with God, in which is the foundation of blessedness for all, for blessedness comes through faith (Phil. 3:9; John 14:6).

Strive with all our effort for uniformity with God and with his will (Rev. 2:6; Ps. 40:8), which best procures his friendship.

Yield ourselves in covenant with God by receiving the conditions of the covenant offered to us, that namely God should become our God (Gen. 17:1), in which every point of our blessedness consists (Ps. 33:12).

Walk with God in the light, and thus we will have communion with him (1 John 1:3, 6-7).

Zealously employ those means by which we are brought closer to God: faith, hope, love, repentance, prayers, and the duties of public and private worship (James 4:8).

Theoretical-Practical Theology, 2:494

God has promised in his covenant of grace, “I will be your God and you will be my people.” He has fulfilled his promise in his Son, our Lord Jesus Christ. When God is our God, when he is our chosen portion and cup, then out of the overflow of our heart, our mouth speaks, “The lines have fallen for me in pleasant places; indeed, I have a beautiful inheritance” (Ps. 16:6).

Whether I have much or whether I have little, I rest in him. The one who rests in God and walks in his ways “is like a tree planted by streams of water that yields its fruit in its season, and its leaf does not wither” (Ps. 1:3).

Now come diseases, come poverty, persecution, death, and any great evil, they will say, “If God be for us, who can be against us?” (Rom. 8:31). Those things may take away the verdure and the foliage of blessedness (which [we] possess in hope and in some way in reality), yet they will never rip out root and trunk. [We] will exult in triumph with the apostle, “Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? … I am persuaded that neither death, nor life, nor anything, shall separate us from the love of God which is in Christ Jesus our Lord” (Rom. 8:35, 38-39).

Theoretical-Practical Theology, 2:495

Only the Christian can taunt disease, poverty, persecution and death—powers before which consumerism and minimalism cower—because only the Christian has Christ. By grace alone his perfect satisfaction, righteousness, and holiness has been credited to me as if I had never sinned nor been a sinner, and as if I had been as perfectly obedient as Christ was obedient for me (Heidelberg Catechism 60).

The source of our misery has been fully dealt with in Christ our Savior. He alone brings us into God’s presence where there is fullness of joy, even to a place of sonship at his right hand where there are pleasures forevermore.


[1] Michael W. Goheen, A Light to the Nations: The Missional Church and the Biblical Story (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic, 2011), 14.

[2] The middle section of Hebrews begins with 4:14-16, “Since then we have a great high priest who has passed through the heavens, Jesus, the Son of God, let us hold fast our confession. For we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but [we do have] one who in every respect has been tempted as we are, yet without sin. Let us then with confidence draw near to the throne of grace, that we may receive mercy and find grace to help in time of need.” The main point of the section is summarized in 8:1-2, “Now the point in what we are saying is this: we have such a high priest, one who is seated at the right hand of the throne of the Majesty in heaven, a minister in the holy places, in the true tent that the Lord set up, not man.” And the section ends with 10:19-25, “Therefore, brothers, since we have confidence to enter the holy places by the blood of Jesus, by the new and living way that he opened for us through the curtain, that is, through his flesh, and since we have a great priest over the house of God, let us draw near with a true heart in full assurance of faith, with our hearts sprinkled clean from an evil conscience and our bodies washed with pure water. Let ushold fast the confession of our hope without wavering, for he who promised is faithful. And let us consider how to stir up one another to love and good works, not neglecting to meet together, as is the habit of some, but encouraging one another, and all the more as you see the Day drawing near.”

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The Fundamentalist-Modernist Controversy and the Spirit of Schleiermacher https://reformedforum.org/the-fundamentalist-modernist-controversy-and-the-spirit-of-schleiermacher/ https://reformedforum.org/the-fundamentalist-modernist-controversy-and-the-spirit-of-schleiermacher/#comments Mon, 03 Feb 2020 10:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=25647 It is a great strength of our Presbyterian and Reformed ethos that we are historically conscious. We enjoy history and pride ourselves on being self-consciously rooted in the past. Confessional and conservative Presbyterians very much have their identity wrapped up in the fundamentalist-modernist controversy. And a central figure in that controversy is our hero of pride, J. Gresham Machen. Machen showed us how to stand for the truth of God’s Word and the Reformed faith even upon pain of humiliation and marginalization.

The way the history is told includes how Machen (and others, of course) opposed liberalism. Machen gave special attention to modernism’s rejection of the supernaturalism of historic Christianity, particularly as that supernaturalism comes to expression in doctrines like the virgin birth and miracles of Jesus.

For generations, this history has aided conservative Presbyterians in defining liberalism. In the main, we have defined a “liberal” as someone who denies a high doctrine of Scripture or Christology. The label “liberal” is (rightly) applied to those who deny the virgin birth, Christ’s resurrection, or the Bible’s inerrancy. Conversely, if a minister in our denomination affirms those things they get a pass (sometimes irrespective of his other theological positions).

That is all well and good. But that way of approaching the evaluation of a man’s theology has its significant liabilities. Those liabilities arise when we realize that the denial of miracles or inerrancy is not the problem, at root. Liberalism, at heart, was a failed apologetic attempt to defend the Christian faith in the face of growing skepticism. And people like Schleiermacher, the father of theological liberalism, was attempting to save Christianity, not destroy it.

Identifying the Source of Liberalism

Friedrich Daniel Ernst Schleiermacher (1768–1834) was the son of a pastor, and pietism was the air he breathed growing up. He struggled with doubts about his faith, doubts his father simply blew off. When he matriculated at the University of Halle, he read deeply in Plato and Kant and found an intellectual home in the Romanticism of the day. He would eventually become a pastor in the state church and a professor at the University of Berlin.

Upon looking for answers to his doubts he found answers in grounding true religion in intuition rather than knowledge. This differed greatly from the older orthodox Protestantism which began with the knowledge of God in revelation. In his great systematic theology, The Christian Faith, he proposed that the basis of all theology is man’s feeling of absolute dependence on God.

Schleiermacher saw increasing skepticism toward the faith among his fellow Bohemians, especially those involved in the arts and literature. He wanted to provide a way for them to believe, despite their allegiance to enlightenment ideas. This was the occasion for his On Religion: Speeches to its Cultured Despisers. These speeches were an apologetic effort to convince modern people of the value of religion.

In this book, Schleiermacher says that religion is the sense and taste for the infinite. If one lives his or her life without religion, it is quite incomplete sans the transcendent. To put it roughly, he argues that religion is good for you. In his introduction to the book, Rudolf Otto explains that Schleiermacher attempted to “lead an age weary with and alien to religion back to its very mainsprings; and to reweave religion, threatened with oblivion, into the incomparably rich fabric of the burgeoning intellectual life of modern times.”

That is a big statement. And it is for several reasons.

First, Schleiermacher offered a defense of religion at a time when it was decreasing in popularity and on the cusp of “oblivion.” Secularism was knocking, and Schleiermacher wanted to turn it away. Second, Schleiermacher attempted a “reweave” of religion, giving it a make-over to present it more palatable to a modern age. Third, the “reweave” would include fabric from “the burgeoning intellectual life of modern times.” To put it simply, Schleiermacher sought to show how religion and modernism could sweetly comply.

To summarize in a very pedestrian way, we might say that Schleiermacher felt a need to help religion survive by recasting it in a way that a modern people would be cool with.

The Spirit of Schleiermacher Today

If liberalism is a disease, the denial of the supernatural is only the symptom. The disease can manifest itself in other symptoms. I worry that conservative Presbyterians are unaware of those symptoms when they arise. That is because we have a kind of confession within our confessionalism. For some, we only fight over “gospel issues” (whatever those are). For others the battleground is only over inerrancy or the five points of Calvinism (include justification by faith in that). And while those are important—even central—issues to fight over, there is surely more.

I would contend that any time we find an attempt to recast our doctrine or practice in order to make us more attractive to the culture, it may be the spirit of Schleiermacher haunting us. In the early twentieth century that came in the form of anti-supernaturalism. But the spirit of Schleiermacher can haunt the halls and pulpits of churches and seminaries that are committed to supernaturalism as well.

For example, if we alter our doctrine of sin so as to not turn off those who identify as “sexual minorities,” we may be exhibiting symptoms of Schleiermacher. If we alter our worship to make it more entertaining to millennials, we may be haunted by the ghost of Schleiermacher. Or, if we seek to placate Arminian or open theist critics of the Reformed doctrine of God by compromising it in a way that they can endorse, Schleiermacher may be in our midst.

The examples can be multiplied, but it can all be boiled down to this: Are we tempted at any point to back off our doctrine or practice for fear of turning off someone on the outside? Are we tempted to recast and restate the faith in order not to offend them? If so, we might just be seeing an apparition of the Berliner apologist among us. Beware of compromised apologetics. 

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https://reformedforum.org/the-fundamentalist-modernist-controversy-and-the-spirit-of-schleiermacher/feed/ 3 It is a great strength of our Presbyterian and Reformed ethos that we are historically conscious We enjoy history and pride ourselves on being self consciously rooted in the past ...Miscellany,ModernChurchReformed Forumnono
Abraham Kuyper’s Public Theology https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc631/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc631/#respond Fri, 31 Jan 2020 05:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=23645 Dr. Jordan J. Ballor, senior research fellow and director of publishing for the Acton Institute, joins us to speak about Abraham Kuyper’s public theology. Dr. Ballor is a general editor of Abraham Kuyper’s Collected Works on Public Theology published by Lexham Press. Kuyper was something of a polymath/renaissance man. Along with being an influential theologian and also a journalist, he served as Prime Minister of the Netherlands between 1901 and 1905. He established the Reformed Churches in the Netherlands, which upon its foundation became the second largest Reformed denomination in the country behind the state-supported Dutch Reformed Church.

Jordan J. Ballor (Dr. theol., University of Zurich; PhD, Calvin Theological Seminary) is a senior research fellow and director of publishing at the Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty. He is also a postdoctoral researcher in theology and economics at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam as part of the “What Good Markets Are Good For” project. 

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc631/feed/ 0 Dr Jordan J Ballor senior research fellow and director of publishing for the Acton Institute joins us to speak about Abraham Kuyper s public theology Dr Ballor is a general ...PracticalTheology,WorldviewReformed Forumnono
J. C. Ryle on Holiness https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp186/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp186/#comments Tue, 28 Jan 2020 06:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=25515 This week on Theology Simply Profound, Rob and Bob discuss the subject of holiness with portions of J. C. Ryle’s classic book, Holiness: Its Nature, Hindrances, Difficulties, and Roots.

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp186/feed/ 1 This week on Theology Simply Profound Rob and Bob discuss the subject of holiness with portions of J C Ryle s classic book Holiness Its Nature Hindrances Difficulties and Roots ...PracticalTheologyReformed Forumnono
Hebrew Discourse Analysis https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc630/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc630/#respond Fri, 24 Jan 2020 05:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=23644 Matthew Patton speaks about his book, Basics of Hebrew Discourse: A Guide to Working with Hebrew Prose and Poetry (Zondervan Academic, 2019). Dr. Patton is pastor of Covenant Presbyterian Church (OPC) in Vandalia, Ohio.

This book, written by Matthew H. Patton, Frederic Clarke Putnam, and Miles V. Van Pelt, is a syntax resource for intermediate Hebrew students. This Basics book introduces students to the principles and exegetical benefits of discourse analysis (text linguistics) when applied to biblical Hebrew prose and poetry. Where standard Hebrew reference grammars have traditionally worked to describe the relationship between words and phrases within discrete clauses (micro syntax), discourse analysis works to describe those relationships that exist between clauses and texts (macro syntax).

This resource fills a needed gap for intermediate Hebrew students and gives them the tools to work with Hebrew syntax on the macro level. Professors and pastors working with Hebrew will also find this one-of-a-kind resource highly valuable.

While students of Hebrew will certainly gain from Patton’s work, listeners will gain a deeper understanding of the Bible and tools for studying it in the English language as well.

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc630/feed/ 0 Matthew Patton speaks about his book Basics of Hebrew Discourse A Guide to Working with Hebrew Prose and Poetry Zondervan Academic 2019 Dr Patton is pastor of Covenant Presbyterian Church ...OldTestamentReformed Forumnono
The Wonderful Tree https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp185/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp185/#respond Tue, 21 Jan 2020 12:36:37 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=25285 This week on Theology Simply Profound, Bob begins reading the 1922 edition of Grace and Glory, a collection of sermons delivered at Princeton Theological Seminary by Geerhardus Vos. The first of these sermons is on Hosea 14:8, “The Wonderful Tree.”

[podcast src=”https://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/12825176/height/90/theme/custom/thumbnail/yes/direction/forward/render-playlist/no/custom-color/990000/” width=”100%” height=”90″ scrolling=”no” class=”podcast-class” frameborder=”0″ placement=”top” use_download_link=”” download_link_text=”” primary_content_url=”http://traffic.libsyn.com/reformedforum/tsp185.mp3″ theme=”custom” custom_color=”990000″ libsyn_item_id=”12825176″ /]

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp185/feed/ 0 This week on Theology Simply Profound Bob begins reading the 1922 edition of Grace and Glory a collection of sermons delivered at Princeton Theological Seminary by Geerhardus Vos The first ...GeerhardusVos,ProphetsReformed Forumnono
The Wonderful Works of God https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc629/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc629/#comments Fri, 17 Jan 2020 05:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=24846 Carlton Wynne and Charles Williams speak about the new edition of Herman Bavinck’s The Wonderful Works of God published by Westminster Seminary Press. The book was first published in English under the title, Our Reasonable Faith. The new edition is re-typeset and includes an introduction by Dr. Wynne, Bavinck’s original introduction translated by Nathaniel Gray Sutanto, and helpful indices collected by Charles Williams.

Carlton Wynne is assistant professor of systematic theology and apologetics at Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia, PA.

Charles Williams is pastor of Bethel Orthodox Presbyterian Church in Wheaton, Illinois.

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc629/feed/ 6 Carlton Wynne and Charles Williams speak about the new edition of Herman Bavinck s The Wonderful Works of God published by Westminster Seminary Press The book was first published in ...HermanBavinck,SystematicTheologyReformed Forumnono
The Two Popes, Rahner, and Divine Immutability https://reformedforum.org/the-two-popes-rahner-and-divine-immutability/ https://reformedforum.org/the-two-popes-rahner-and-divine-immutability/#comments Wed, 15 Jan 2020 19:22:07 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=25110 I recently watched The Two Popes, a film written by Anthony McCarten and directed by Fernando Meirelles available on Netflix. The movie recounts the relationship between Joseph Ratzinger and Jorge Bergoglio through the death of Pope John Paul II, Ratzinger’s election to become Pope Benedict XVI, and his subsequent resignation and the election of Bergoglio to become Pope Francis. Surely, the creators have taken a measure of creative license in portraying the dialogue between the two men, but it serves the film well as it should. Jonathan Pryce and Anthony Hopkins have each been nominated for Academy Awards, which would be reason enough for me to watch. Nonetheless, I thoroughly enjoyed the film, and found it moving and thought-provoking.

Prior to Benedict’s resignation, Cardinal Bergoglio had planned to retire. To do so, he wanted the approval of Benedict, who was more than a little reticent. Given many of Bergoglio’s simple lifestyle and public comments, Ratzinger felt Bergoglio’s retirement would be seen as a protest against Ratzinger and the conservative direction of the Catholic Church.

There is a powerful scene in which Pope Benedict XVI and Cardinal Bergoglio stroll through the garden of the Pope’s summer residence. They debate the status and direction of the church.

Ratzinger: “God does not change.”

Bergoglio: “Yes, he does. He moves toward us.”

Ratzinger: “I am the way, the truth, and the life. Where should we find him if he is always moving?”

Bergoglio: “On the journey?”

Ratzinger: “Oh. . . This is your ego talking. You think you know better.”

There is more here than merely a difference in personality or philosophy of life. These two figures express vastly different approaches to theology proper.

The “real” Bergoglio has perplexed many during his tenure as pope. Much of what he says and the way in which he operates is understandable if you have studied the theological threads in Vatican II and one of the most significant theologians coming out of the Council. Pope Francis, a Jesuit, espouses a similar theological construct to that of Karl Rahner.

Around the time of Vatican II (1962–1965), Ratzinger and Rahner were set apart as something akin to theological nemeses. Personally, I would love to see a Ratzinger and Rahner sequel. Netflix, hear me out 😉 Perhaps the most recognizable feature of Rahner’s theology is his Trinitarian axiom. The so-called “Rahner’s Rule” states, “the immanent Trinity is the economic Trinity and vice versa” (Rahner, The Trinity [New York: Crossroad, 1997], 22). This is often misunderstood as modalism, but Rahner’s doctrine of the Trinity cannot be reduced to this. Rahner does not make the trinitarian persons change in relation to creation so much as he “eternalizes” them as modes of divine self-communication.

Son and Spirit are eternal, consubstantial persons of the Trinity. Yet, the Son as begotten and the Spirit as proceeding should be understood as self-communications of the “unoriginate” (think “unbegotten”) Father. Rahner leans heavily upon the Eastern tradition, which states that the Father communicates the divine essence to the Son and Spirit. Though falling with the ecumenical tradition, this is not Reformed [Update: see comments below]. Calvin, for example, affirmed that the Son is autotheos (God himself). He does not receive the divine essence from the Father. Rather, his begottenness refers specifically to his personality. What distinguishes the Son from the Father is not that the Son is derivatively divine, it is his incommunicable personal property of begottenness. The same could be said of the Holy Spirit, who is consubstantial and, according to the Western tradition, proceeds from both the Father and the Son.

How then do we understand these persons in their relation to one another and then their relation to the world? The fictional Bergoglio says God changes by “moving towards us,” and we come to find him “on the journey.” Where would a modern theologian locate such change without denouncing the ecumenical tradition?

Even while maintaining immutability in the essence of God, some theologians have recently sought to locate change in the divine persons. In such a formulation, God does not change according to his essence. Nevertheless, he changes personally (according to the divine hypostases as he relates to creation).

This view fails to grasp the doctrine of perichoresis (the mutual indwelling or co-inhabitation of the divine persons). What is the divine essence apart from the persons? And what are the persons without an essence? There is no “portion” of the divine essence that is not fully indwelt by each of the three persons under all possible circumstances. Likewise, there are no private portions of the trinitarian persons that are not fully dwelling in the divine essence, and therefore, in and through one another. Herman Bavinck is particularly instructive at this point:

The divine nature cannot be conceived as an abstract generic concept, nor does it exist as a substance outside of, above, and behind the divine persons. It exists in the divine persons and is totally and quantitatively the same in each person. The persons, though distinct, are not separate. They are the same in essence, one in essence, and the same being. They are not separated by time or space or anything else. They all share in the same divine nature and perfections. It is one and the same divine nature that exists in each person individually and in all of them collectively. Consequently, there is in God but one eternal, omnipotent, and omniscient being, having one mind, one will, and one power. . . . All created beings necessarily exist in space and time and therefore live side by side or sequentially. But the attributes of eternity, omnipresence, omnipotence, goodness, and so on, by their very nature exclude all separation and division. God is absolute unity and simplicity, without composition or division; and that unity itself is not ethical or contractual in nature, as it is among humans, but absolute; nor is it accidental, but it is essential to the divine being.

Herman Bavinck, Reformed Dogmatics, 2:300.

The processions in his being simultaneously bring about in God his absolute personality, his trinitarian character, and his immanent relations. They are the absolute archetypes of all those processions by which human nature achieves its full development in the individual, in the family, and in humanity as a whole. For that reason the three persons, though distinct from each other, are not different. The “threeness” derives from, exists in, and serves the “oneness.” The unfolding of the divine being occurs within that being, thus leaving the oneness and simplicity of that being undiminished.

Bavinck, Reformed Dogmatics, 2:306.

Bavinck advances a theology that is much sounder than locating real change in the divine persons. While not denying a genuine loving relationship between God and his people in history, Bavinck remains thoroughly faithful to the orthodox ecumenical tradition and, more importantly, to the testimony of Scripture, by affirming an absolute immutability and simplicity for God (essence and persons). In other words, he denies real change in God.

I am using the word “real” in the sense used by classical theism. It is not a synonym for “genuine” or “legitimate.” It refers to ontology, that is, the study of beings. God exists, yet he does not change. He is immutable in his essence as well as in each of the three persons. Certainly, creation changes in relation to God, and we may speak about that change in certain ways (e.g. we once were children of wrath but now are under grace), yet God remains unchanged. The Lord declared through the prophet Malachi, “For I the LORD do not change; therefore you, O children of Jacob, are not consumed (Mal. 3:6).” Praise the Lord that we may seek him and find him. He will never change his mind and consume us in his wrath. Through Christ, we may have a genuine, personal, loving relationship with the triune God precisely because he does not change.

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https://reformedforum.org/the-two-popes-rahner-and-divine-immutability/feed/ 8 I recently watched The Two Popes a film written by Anthony McCarten and directed by Fernando Meirelles available on Netflix The movie recounts the relationship between Joseph Ratzinger and Jorge ...ModernChurch,Theology(Proper)Reformed Forumnono
A Christian View of Economics https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc628/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc628/#comments Fri, 10 Jan 2020 05:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=23286 Shawn Ritenour, Professor of Economics at Grove City College, speaks about the basics of economics and the Christian principles upon which the study must be based. Dr. Ritenour is the author of Foundations of Economics: A Christian View (Wipf & Stock).

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc628/feed/ 3 Shawn Ritenour Professor of Economics at Grove City College speaks about the basics of economics and the Christian principles upon which the study must be based Dr Ritenour is the ...PracticalTheology,WorldviewReformed Forumnono
Exodus 2:1–10 — The Birth, Burial, and Resurrection of a Savior https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/pc81/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/pc81/#respond Wed, 08 Jan 2020 20:09:47 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=24815 In episode 81, Joel Fick leads us in a study of the birth of Moses. He demonstrates a model of preaching Christ not based upon merely noting a few parallels between an Old Testament character and the life of Christ, but based upon deep theological themes and direct scriptural references.

[podcast src=”https://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/12664838/height/90/theme/custom/thumbnail/yes/direction/forward/render-playlist/no/custom-color/990000/” width=”100%” height=”90″ scrolling=”no” class=”podcast-class” frameborder=”0″ placement=”bottom” use_download_link=”” download_link_text=”” primary_content_url=”http://traffic.libsyn.com/reformedforum/pc081.mp3″ theme=”custom” custom_color=”990000″ libsyn_item_id=”12664838″ /]

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/pc81/feed/ 0 In episode 81 Joel Fick leads us in a study of the birth of Moses He demonstrates a model of preaching Christ not based upon merely noting a few parallels ...MinistryoftheWord,Miscellany,Pentateuch,PreachingReformed Forumnono
Vos Group #60 — The Intra-Mental State of the Prophet https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc627/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc627/#respond Fri, 03 Jan 2020 05:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=24111 We turn to pages 224–229 of Vos’s book, Biblical Theology, to speak about the intra-mental state of the prophet, by which Vos means to inquire into “how the soul felt and reacted under the things shown within the vision” (p. 224).

Far too much attention has been given to what is represented by the Greek term ecstasis. The term served first as a translation of the Hebrew tardemah (cf. Gen. 2:21 with Adam and Genesis 15:12 with Abram). In Adam’s case, there is no visionary state. In Abram’s case, there is such a vision (expound the theology of the theophany). But tardemah does not throw any light on Abram’s state of mind.

Ecstasis, on the other hand, has a very definite conception in Greek consciousness that leads in the direction of error. That conception is that of “insanity or mania” and was applied to the oracular process—the process of receiving visions and the resultant state in which it put the seer-prophet. This led to a close association between the prophet and some feature of instability—some manic tendency that seems inherent to the process of receiving a vision.

Vos points us to God’s inspired, inerrant, and infallible revelation in history, which does not bypass the human mind or allow the recipient to escape his humanity, but elevates him to greater communion with God.

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc627/feed/ 0 We turn to pages 224 229 of Vos s book Biblical Theology to speak about the intra mental state of the prophet by which Vos means to inquire into how ...BiblicalTheology,GeerhardusVos,Prophets,VosGroupReformed Forumnono
Recommended Books of 2019 https://reformedforum.org/recommended-books-of-2019/ https://reformedforum.org/recommended-books-of-2019/#comments Tue, 31 Dec 2019 18:27:34 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=24561 At the end of the year, I find it rewarding to reflect upon the books I read that year. Whether they be old favorites or new titles, the record of my reading serves as something of a playlist tracking the events of my life. I can remember what happened while I was working through many of the books. Some may be pleasant memories—others not so much. At the end of 2019, we bring you several suggestions that we hope will bring a little joy to you in 2020. While not all of these books have been published in 2019, the following contributors read them this year and continue to recommend them, which may demonstrate each book’s value all the more.

Tom Holland, Dominion: The Making of the Western Mind

—Charles Williams, pastor, Bethel OPC in Wheaton, Illinois

It is a rare feat for a work of history to be both compelling and substantive, and Holland is here a hidden gem. I enjoyed Holland’s translation of Herodotus, and was familiar with some of his other historical books, and had thus been eagerly awaiting the release of this book for months. It just so happened that while on a trip to London, I stumbled across Dominion in a gift shop at the British Museum, and picked it up immediately. (Of interest, the cover to the UK edition is much more second-commandment friendly than its US counterpart.)

In short, Dominion is not so much a history of Christianity in the West as it is a history of Christianity’s impact on the West. Be it abolitionism, the rights of the unborn, the Civil Rights movement, or even (as he contends) woke culture, Holland demonstrates that these concerns for the worth of every individual are not found in classical Greece or Rome, but Judeo-Christian values. Worth noting is that Holland writes as a sympathetic unbeliever—not unlike Douglas Murray, Camille Paglia, or Jordan Peterson. Though himself agnostic, Holland comes to Christianity’s defense with the wit of Chesterton and the charm of Lewis.

The book, of course, is not without its shortcomings. For a work discussing the benefits Christianity affords, no space is given to the actual benefits of redemption: the pardon of sin, reconciliation with God, adoption into his family, or the cleansing work of the Spirit in the heart of the sinner. That said, Holland has a different focus in his purview, on what we might call the ‘collateral benefits’ of Christianity on the wider culture. How refreshing it is, however, to read an Oxford historian attest to the truth that the enemies of the cross are themselves operating from borrowed capital. As Holland asserts, not even the so-called “new atheism” can critique Christianity without resting on Judeo-Christian presuppositions. 
And though there is plenty here for the reader to digest and learn, at the end of the day, Dominion is simply a lot of fun to read. 

J. W. Burrow, The Crisis of Reason: European Thought, 1848–1914

—Carl Trueman, professor of biblical and religious studies at Grove City College in Grove City, Pennsylvania

The book I have read recently that I would recommend to others is a few years old but wide-ranging in its scope, profound in its analysis, and often witty in its manner of expression: The Crisis of Reason: European Thought, 1848–1914 (Yale University Press, 2002) by J. W. Burrow which was brought to my attention by Mike Allen at RTS. Burrow offers a brilliant account of the emergence of Western modernity. He strives to avoid anachronism by not simply focusing on thinkers and ideas in this period which persisted but also on those which enjoyed great vogue in their time but were quickly consigned to the trash can of history. In doing so, Burrow implicitly relativizes the trendy orthodoxies of our own day while also giving us a much broader context for understanding the emergence and significance of modernity. If we Christians tend too often to have our minds mesmerized by the immediate and to treat cultural symptoms as if they were causes, then this book provides a great antidote. And surely it is worth reading anyone who can pen the following sentence: “It is hard not to feel that someone with the nervous system of Kaiser Wilhelm II should ideally never be allowed anywhere near a phrase like ‘the struggle for existence.'” Highly recommended.

Michael Morales, Who Shall Ascend the Mountain of the Lord?: A Biblical Theology of the Book of Leviticus

—Glen Clary, pastor of Providence OPC in Pflugerville, Texas

For many Christians, Leviticus is a difficult book to understand. The redemptive-historical significance of the regulations for sacrificial worship, the dietary laws, the rituals for purification, etc. is not always easy to discern. Morales has produced a fascinating study of Leviticus that uncovers its literary setting as the centerpiece of the Pentateuch and traces its redemptive-historical message to its climactic fulfillment in Christ. Morales is especially sensitive to the cosmological typology of the tabernacle and its regulations for worship. His thesis could have been strengthened and advanced had he interacted with the insights of M. G. Kline. Aside from that unfortunate omission, Morales’s book is a strong contribution to the burgeoning discipline of biblical theology. I highly commend it to anyone wishing to understand the purpose of the tabernacle, the priesthood, and its sacrificial cultus.

Jason Hunt, Cornelius Van Til’s Doctrine of God and its Relevance for Contemporary Hermeneutics

—Jim Cassidy, pastor of South Austin OPC in South Austin, Texas

Cornelius Van Til’s Doctrine of God and its Relevance for Contemporary Hermeneutics by Jason Hunt is a 2019 Wipf and Stock publication. It joins the growing library of academic research works originating from outside the Westminster Seminary orbit on the thought of Van Til. Other studies that come to mind are Ralph Smith’s 2003 monograph Paradox and Truth: Rethinking Van Til on the Trinity and B.A. Bosserman’s 2014 published dissertation (Bangor University) The Trinity and the Vindication of Christian Paradox: An Interpretation and Refinement of the Theological Apologetic of Cornelius Van Til. Rushdoony’s more popular treatment By What Standard (1983) deserves honorable mention. Even though “Rush” served in the Orthodox Presbyterian Church for a time his education was entirely outside of the Westminster sphere. Other academic works were written by those coming under Westminster’s direct tutelage (think Bahnsen, Frame, Gaffin and Tipton).

Hunt shows how Van Til’s doctrine of God, particularly the Creator-creature distinction and the self-contained nature of the Trinity, may be leveraged for the purposes of refining our hermeneutic method. “Method and doctrine,” after all, belong together (p. 211). While Van Til did not write extensively on hermeneutics as such, Hunt makes explicit how a Reformed doctrine of God provides guidance on human interpretation. Specifically, he brings Van Til’s doctrine of God into direct conversation with “post-conservative evangelical” theologians like Pete Enns (among others). What is especially interesting is how Hunt brings Van Til’s theological insights to bear upon the issue of how to understand the New Testament’s use of the Old Testament (which has been a point of no little contention among evangelical exegetes over the last decade or so).

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https://reformedforum.org/recommended-books-of-2019/feed/ 1 At the end of the year I find it rewarding to reflect upon the books I read that year Whether they be old favorites or new titles the record of ...MiscellanyReformed Forumnono
2019 Highlights https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc626/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc626/#respond Fri, 27 Dec 2019 05:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=24101 Since Christ the Center began nearly twelve years ago, we have taken time to look back on the highlights of the year. Given that we now post highlights from each episode every week we have taken an analytic approach. These are this year’s top ten clips from Christ the Center as determined by YouTube views.

  1. Episode 614 — Bracy Hill, Nimrod, the Mighty Hunter
  2. Episode 600 — Glen Clary, Praying in Tongues
  3. Episode 580 — Camden Bucey, Liberation Theology
  4. Episode 603 — Cornelis Venema, Karl Barth and the Doctrine of Election
  5. Episode 600 — Glen Clary, What Is Cessationism?
  6. Episode 598 — Christopher Watkin, The Problem of the One and Many
  7. Episode 603 — Cornelis Venema, Augustine and Pelagius
  8. Episode 578 — Carl Trueman, Luther and Zwingli at Marburg
  9. Episode 619 — Alan Strange and Brian DeJong, The Orthodox Presbyterian Church and the United Reformed Churches in North America
  10. Episode 613 — Will Wood, Schools of Biblical Criticism
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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc626/feed/ 0 Since Christ the Center began nearly twelve years ago we have taken time to look back on the highlights of the year Given that we now post highlights from each ...Apologetics,ChurchHistory,PracticalTheology,SystematicTheologyReformed Forumnono
Christmas Traditions! https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp184/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp184/#respond Tue, 24 Dec 2019 06:00:57 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=24241 Welcome to the Fourth Annual Theology Simply Profound Christmas Special where Rob and Bob discuss Christmas traditions and everything silly that popped into their vacation ready minds. Merry Christmas!

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/tsp184/feed/ 0 Welcome to the Fourth Annual Theology Simply Profound Christmas Special where Rob and Bob discuss Christmas traditions and everything silly that popped into their vacation ready minds Merry Christmas podcast ...ChristmasReformed Forumnono
Puritan: All of Life to the Glory of God https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc625/ https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc625/#respond Fri, 20 Dec 2019 05:00:00 +0000 http://reformedforum.org/?p=22745 David Woollin of Reformation Heritage Books and Matthew Robinson of Media Gratiae discuss Puritan: All of Life to the Glory of God. Centered around a feature-length film, the full box set includes books, thirty-five Sunday school lessons, and other resources for education.

[podcast src=”https://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/12294557/height/90/theme/custom/thumbnail/yes/direction/forward/render-playlist/no/custom-color/990000/” width=”100%” height=”90″ scrolling=”no” class=”podcast-class” frameborder=”0″ placement=”bottom” use_download_link=”” download_link_text=”” primary_content_url=”http://traffic.libsyn.com/reformedforum/ctc625.mp3″ theme=”custom” custom_color=”990000″ libsyn_item_id=”12294557″ /]

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https://reformedforum.org/podcasts/ctc625/feed/ 0 David Woollin of Reformation Heritage Books and Matthew Robinson of Media Gratiae discuss Puritan All of Life to the Glory of God Centered around a feature length film the full ...ThePuritansReformed Forumnono