Reformed Catholicity

Michael Allen and Scott Swain discuss whether Christians and churches can be both catholic and Reformed. In their book Reformed Catholicity: The Promise of Retrieval for Theology and Biblical Interpretation (Baker Academic), Allen and Swain suggest Reformed Christians can commit not only to the ultimate authority of Scripture but also to receiving Scripture within the context of the apostolic church. This manifesto presents a case that to be Reformed means to go deeper into true catholicity rather than away from it. At the same time, it means holding fast to sola Scriptura.

Michael Allen is Associate Professor of Systematic and Historical Theology and Dean of Students and Scott Swain is Associate Professor of Systematic Theology and Academic Dean at Reformed Theological Seminary in Orlando, Florida.

Participants: , , ,

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Timothy Joseph

1 month ago

I found this discussion of this book profitable. Yet, the argument for ecclesiastical authority as the basis for the validity of Catholicity is more Catholic or Orthodox than Protestant. Certainly, the Creeds and Confessions carry great weight, but not based on Ecclesiastical authority, instead on their scriptural basis. In addition, the comments on proof texting again seem more Ecclesiastic than Evangelical. Of course using texts from a broad swath of scripture to support a doctrine is useful, that is not the issue, the lack of the texts used actually in their individual context relating to the doctrine is!
I am a bit surprised that RTS Orlando did not find much of the teaching in this book less Reformed than they are.


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