Charles Hodge and the Spirituality of the Church

Dr. Alan Strange is professor of church history and apologetics at Mid-America Reformed Seminary and associate pastor of New Covenant Community Church in Joliet, Illinois. Dr. Strange sits with us to speak about the great American Presbyterian, Charles Hodge, and his contribution to the Doctrine of the Church. Hodge was a proponent of the doctrine known as the Spirituality of the Church. While many Reformed theologians are familiar with the name of the doctrine, its permutations are many. Dr. Strange details the history of the doctrine through several controversies of which Charles Hodge was involved. By understanding this history, we learn many important practical lessons for the Church today.

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Christ the Center focuses on Reformed Christian theology. In each episode a group of informed panelists discusses important issues in order to encourage critical thinking and a better understanding of Reformed doctrine with a view toward godly living. Browse more episodes from this program and learn how to subscribe.

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Matt V.

1 year ago

So good and interesting. Please have him back on!

Blessings,
Matt

Benjamin L. Smith

1 year ago

This was a very instructive discussion and demonstrated once again that often our classical sources have already addressed our current political and cultural issues with more depth and rigor than current interpretations. In my own field, I have been endlessly rewarded by Plato’s political insights in the Republic that prove true over and over again.

Interestingly, I was discussing some of these same matters with a friend just last week. There are a great number of parallels to this discussion among various Roman Catholic theologians; even with the medieval period there is much more diversity than one might expect.

Dr. Strange spoke well when introduced the phrase “point of integration.” For Thomas Aquinas this point of integration migrated somewhat during the course of his writings, but in his most mature work, he sees the point of integration in the moral part of the divine law (Scripture in his terminology), which he identifies with the natural law. I believe both Calvin and Hodge make similar connections. I think these are connections well worth exploring.

Benjamin L. Smith

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