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God and Necessity

Jared Oliphint and Nathan Shannon discuss Brian Leftow’s God and Necessity (Oxford University Press). In this volume, Leftow seeks to offer a metaphysic of modality. This leads him into a discussion of necessity and possibility, truth making, God’s nature, and divine simplicity. It’s a wide-ranging title, but one that offers many important themes for consideration. Dr. Shannon has written a review of the book that will appear soon in the Westminster Theological Journal.

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Reformed Catholicity

Michael Allen and Scott Swain discuss whether Christians and churches can be both catholic and Reformed. In their book Reformed Catholicity: The Promise of Retrieval for Theology and Biblical Interpretation (Baker Academic), Allen and Swain suggest Reformed Christians can commit not only to the ultimate authority of Scripture but also to receiving Scripture within the context of the apostolic church. This manifesto presents a case that to be Reformed means to go deeper into true catholicity rather than away from it. At the same time, it means holding fast to sola Scriptura.

Michael Allen is Associate Professor of Systematic and Historical Theology and Dean of Students and Scott Swain is Associate Professor of Systematic Theology and Academic Dean at Reformed Theological Seminary in Orlando, Florida.

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Covenantal Apologetics and Common-Sense Realism

Nathaniel Gray Sutanto joins us to speak about apologetics and his recent article titled, “Covenantal Apologetics and Common-Sense Realism: Recalibrating the Argument from Consciousness as a Test Case” in JETS, 57/4 (2014) 773–91. In this article, Gray offers a covenantal and presuppositional criticism of common-sense realism.

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Highlights from 2014

We close our year with a look at some of our best clips from 2014. Listen to the full episodes of the clips we’ve chosen to include by using the following links:

  • Episode 318 — Michael Kruger, The Question of Canon
  • Episode 322 — James Anderson on worldviews
  • Episode 326 — Matt Perman on gospel-driven productivity
  • Episode 329 — Randall Pederson on the Puritan family resemblance
  • Episode 331 — Lane Tipton on the Tree of Life and the goal of eschatology
  • Episode 335 —Shai Linne on hip-hop, the gospel, and cultural contextualization
  • Episode 345 — Marcus Peter Johnson on union with Christ and the incarnation
  • Episode 351 — Charles Hill on the New Testament, the early church and Bart Ehrman’s book How Jesus Became God
  • Episode 357 — Glen Clary on Zwingli, church tradition, and Reformed worship

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[Review] Logos Bible Software 6

Jared Oliphint and Camden Bucey explore the latest version of Logos Bible Software discussing new features and personal use cases. Here are just a few of the new features:

  • The Gold Edition includes 1,034 books
  • Textual Variants tool
  • Lexham Textual Notes on the Bible
  • Online Textual Variants Manuscripts
  • Facsimile Resources (Books.Logos.com)
  • All of the Atlas maps (3 volumes)
  • Psalm browser (called “Form and Structure of the Psalms” in the software)
  • Proverbs browser (called “Proverbs in the Hebrew Bible” in the software)
  • Lexham Glossary of Semantic Roles, Sense Section

You can save 15% by using our partner page: http://www.logos.com/reformedforum

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How God Became Jesus

Drs. Michael J. Kruger and Charles E. Hill speak about a book to which Dr. Hill contributed, How God Became Jesus: The Real Origins of Belief in Jesus’ Divine Nature, a response to Bart D. Ehrman’s How Jesus Became God: The Exaltation of a Jewish Preacher from Galilee. The thesis of Dr. Ehrman’s book is that the doctrine of Jesus’ divinity was an early accretion onto the original truth of Jesus identity – neither Jesus nor Jesus’ disciples believed he was divine. How God Became Jesus is the first book-length response to Ehrman’s latest, and includes a contribution by Dr. Chuck Hill. Their thesis is that Jesus and his disciples rightly believed him to be divine, and that the later formulations of this doctrine reflected that early and accurate tradition.

Dr. Charles Hill is John R. Richardson Professor of New Testament and Early Christianity at Reformed Theological Seminary, Orlando, Florida. His most recent publications include Who Chose the Gospels? Probing the Great Gospel Conspiracy (Oxford University Press, 2010) and The Early Text of the New Testament (Oxford University Press, 2012), edited with Dr. Kruger. He contributed to How God Became Jesus, which also features contributions by Michael Bird, Craig Evans, Simon Gathercole, and Chris Tilling.

Dr. Michael Kruger is President and Professor of New Testament at Reformed Theological Seminary in Charlotte, NC. He received his Ph.D. from New College, The University of Edinburgh, Scotland. He is the author of Canon Revisited: Establishing the Origins and Authority of the New Testament Books (Crossway, 2012), The Early Text of the New Testament (Oxford, 2012; edited with Dr. Hill), and The Question of Canon (Intervarsity, 2013). Dr. Kruger has spoken on Christ the Center episodes 217 and 283 and 318.

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Union with Christ and the Body of Christ

Once again, we are joined by Dr. Marcus Johnson, author of One with Christ: An Evangelical Theology of Salvation. This time Dr. Johnson spells out the implications of the doctrine of union with Christ for the application of salvation and for Christ’s body, the church. For the first part of our interview with Dr. Johnson, click here.

Dr. Johnson is Associate Professor of Theology at Moody Bible Institute in Chicago, IL. He received his M.A. from Trinity Evangelical Divinity School and his Ph.D. from Trinity College, University of Toronto. Camden Bucey reviewed One with Christ on a recent episode of Reformed Media Review.

Link to Austin theology conference.

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